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Kiln use in Spare bedroom?


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Hi,  This is my first time visiting this forum let alone using a forum.  

I was hoping for some help in regards to how to set up my new pottery studio.  I just bought myself a used electric kiln (Sitters Model K) and was wondering if it is safe for me to have it in my second bedroom where I have set up my wheel and everything else to work with clay.  I am not sure how far it can be from the walls, if they may have fire proofed the walls some how,  if it should be by a window and if anyone else has a home studio in one of their spare rooms (and what they have done).   I live in Whistler so I could put it on the deck possibly however I believe the cord would have to go through the window and my deck is unfortunately not water proof (a very poor design). 

Thank you for your help in advance

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1 hour ago, Anita D'Onghia said:

I started looking at the kiln vent.  It looks like it is a generic one you can buy. I do have a window would I be using the kiln vent out of that window?  Thank you that answers my question about the deck.  

 

 

Yeah you can run the vent out of the window while the kiln is running, and then remove the vent from the window while it's not in use.

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11 hours ago, Anita D'Onghia said:

Hi,  This is my first time visiting this forum let alone using a forum.  

I was hoping for some help in regards to how to set up my new pottery studio.  I just bought myself a used electric kiln (Sitters Model K) and was wondering if it is safe for me to have it in my second bedroom where I have set up my wheel and everything else to work with clay.  I am not sure how far it can be from the walls, if they may have fire proofed the walls some how,  if it should be by a window and if anyone else has a home studio in one of their spare rooms (and what they have done).   I live in Whistler so I could put it on the deck possibly however I believe the cord would have to go through the window and my deck is unfortunately not water proof (a very poor design). 

Thank you for your help in advance

Your kiln has a make and model number. The sitter likely refers to the kiln sitter which is a switch that was used on many kilns. The switch is a way to turn your kiln off once the firing is complete.  Many different kiln makers used this switch. I mention all this because a good start would be to figure out the make and model, then google and get the kiln manual. The manufacture will have specific recommendations for their.

Its also helpful here for folks to have some idea what size this kiln is. If you post the make and model that may help others here with their opinion.

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sure it can be done but it sounds like you need to do much more research before you do it. I would use this thread as a start but I would also surf on things like kiln safety and make sure you really get it. Also I would never go to bed with a running kiln inside my house without checking on it regularily.

here a good primer u might read

https://ceramic.school/kiln-location/

 

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Sitter Model K is not the brand of the kiln,  it is the model of the sitter.  Have you ever fired a kiln before?   It would help to take a ceramics class and volunteer to help load and fire the class kiln.   Before you invest in a vent system you need to have a electrician check your wiring in that room,  most bedrooms do not have the heavy wiring needed for a kiln.  What type of floor do you have?   Cement would work the best you will have to put some cement board and patio stones on a wood floor,  you will also need your kiln on a stand.   I would also buy a cheap square window fan if you have another window open in the house it can help pull excess heat and fumes outside.   This set up only works in nice weather.   I have a kiln vent and a  ceiling exhaust vent in my kiln room and still like to have the fan in the window.  The first thing you need to deal with is the electricity.    Denice
 

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It is a Cress Electric Kiln 

model number: B-18-14  take up 240V of energy

It has a metal stand and my floors are vinyl - I guess I need to buy some sort of metal protection for underneath the stand or ceramic tiles maybe from my research I have been doing??

I had an electrician come today and he is going to set up a plug that is energy compatible.  It seems like that has been sorted quite easily.  It is going be the same as a dryer plug outlet and my electrical outlet happens to be in my pottery studio (the second bedroom).  

I am nervous about the kiln distributing too much heat and burning the walls.  I looked into that as well and it seems like as long as there is 3 feet of clearance between the kiln and the walls of the room.  It should be fine.  I would love our opinion though.

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Just a little bit about my background as a potter.  I have been potting for over 10 years as a hobby and have gone to studios to do my work.  I have stacked and used kilns before.  Just one and the one I have is smaller but similar however it was in a huge pottery studion in a highschool with high ceilings, kiln vents and space.  The window were always opened when it was running.  I feel comfortable bisque firing however glaze firing I have always done workshops and I go and pay money to have them fired so this would be something I would have to take coursed for in the future.  Right now I just want to bisque fire my work and do my glazing the way I usually do it.  

I am still playing with the idea of keeping the kiln outside (I would keep it tarped up when not in use) to fire in the summer and store it in the winter in my pottery studio since the plug will be close enough to the window to beable to plug it in.  What would happen if I left the kiln on the deck?  

I appreciate all this help.  This a big step for me and if the kiln wasn't pretty much given to me.  I probably would not of done such a step so again I really appreciate all your insight

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I have my kilns outdoors under a carport, it works really well.  If you can add a small shelter for it, I think it'll be great outdoors.  If not, i wouldn't leave it outdoors tarped up. 

I had one of my kilns tarped up tightly but with wind and rain, it finds a way to get inside.  It also makes a nice little spot for a critter to take shelter.  In a pinch it might be fine, but overall I think you'll see a lot more degradation than if you had a shelter in place or left it indoors.

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25 minutes ago, Anita D'Onghia said:

Just a little bit about my background as a potter.  I have been potting for over 10 years as a hobby and have gone to studios to do my work.  I have stacked and used kilns before.  Just one and the one I have is smaller but similar however it was in a huge pottery studion in a highschool with high ceilings, kiln vents and space.  The window were always opened when it was running.  I feel comfortable bisque firing however glaze firing I have always done workshops and I go and pay money to have them fired so this would be something I would have to take coursed for in the future.  Right now I just want to bisque fire my work and do my glazing the way I usually do it.  

I am still playing with the idea of keeping the kiln outside (I would keep it tarped up when not in use) to fire in the summer and store it in the winter in my pottery studio since the plug will be close enough to the window to beable to plug it in.  What would happen if I left the kiln on the deck?  

I appreciate all this help.  This a big step for me and if the kiln wasn't pretty much given to me.  I probably would not of done such a step so again I really appreciate all your insight

Here is a link to the cress manual. Pages three and four have the suggested safety guidelines including clearances etc..... 

https://3fs7rd1xi6sy2zofjv3g0a0q-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/BASIC-KILN-MANUAL-FOR-ABC-KILNS-1.pdf

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anita, you are describing the exact situation i was in when i got my first kiln.   i was in a 3 bedroom condominium apartment.   the kiln was a paragon, 18x18 inches.   i had an electrician install a thick wire from the main circuit breaker panel into the 3rd bedroom through the closet wall and into the center of the room where the kiln was.    the kiln sat on a stack of concrete blocks about 4 inches thick by 8x16 inches.  it was high enough off the carpeted floor that it was easy to reach inside of without bending over.   the carpet was covered by a 4x4 foot square of metal and then the stack of blocks and the kiln stand.   of course i closed the door during firing and stayed out except to turn up the knobs every hour.

i fired with the window open and a fan running.   had no problems.  the room was about 10x12 feet.

remember that the heat of a kiln is intended to be inside the shell and bricks surrounding the ware.   the bricks are insulating bricks.   i am in no way suggesting that there is no danger from touching the kiln covering or lid, just trying to let you know that you may be over-thinking the dangers.    assuming you prevent kids,pets and anyone else from entering the room while the kiln is firing, you should be fine.

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If possible, if you can't do it yourself, have the electrician take the covers off the outside panels so you can have a look, and clean out debris.

The last used one I hooked up had a nickel in it, that's what made it short and get sold.

Leaves and spider webs also make excellent kindling.

Clean that out, and you are further on your way to excitement!

I'd highly recommend a permanent hole drilled for the fan, or a permanent through the window setup. No use having a fan fall in and vent into the room. Or forgetting to put it in the window.

You can use a 3x5x.5 Hardiebacker for over the floor. Tile it. With handmade tiles! Lol! 

My Sorceress was in fear of the Gas Kiln, till she was warming her hands near it!

Make sure your electrician uses the guidelines in the manual. If you are Amy significant distance from your electric panel, you're going to need big, costly wire. Many electricians don't understand kilns, or their jobs at all. Vet him.

Sorce

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in reading over what i said, i realize that you might think i used only one 4 inch thick concrete block.   there were at least 3, maybe 4 stacked vertically  under the feet of the metal stand,   therefore 12 to 16 inches above the metal covering the rug.  total purchase of 12 or 16 blocks.

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