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Does anyone know of any manufacturers that would be willing to mix in ingredients into their clay body at a commercial level? For example if I ordered say 1 ton of clay, do you think they would mix in course grog and feldspar chips? I am doing all of this by hand and I am pretty certain this is the future of my work, but its a massive undertaking every day to wedge in course grog and grit every single time before I throw. I don't mind doing it, I am getting some big muscles, but I would much rather just open the bag and get to it.

I haven't been able to find any clay with these types of additions already added, which makes sense because I doubt any other cone 6 potters want this type of crap in their clay, but I do!

Anyone have any ideas? For now I am just going to continue manually doing it I guess. 

I just love the way the clay throws with the added course grog as well as the grit, it makes throwing it so delicate and trimming it reveals this beautiful madness within as chunks of grit and clay pull away. Then I coat it with my formulated black crackling slip and I can't get enough!

 

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Edited by Joseph Fireborn
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Whenever I wedge stuff into clay I cut and slam.  Best way I've found to do it.  No spirals of weird stuff, pretty uniform distribution.  10 cut and slams is 2 to the tenth layers which means each layer is almost indistinguishable from eachother to the human eye, add a few rounds of spiral or Ramshead and voila, crunchy goodness.

I got some, ahem, "granular" Custer from my pottery supply.  It was more like... Coarse 3/4 inch gravel, so I smashed it up a bit and wedged it into my cone 6 clay body.  A whole lot of disappointment ensued.  I wish they carried something like coarse neph sy, because I think that would be a lot more interesting at cone 6.

Our camping spot in the mountains is just a giant basalt field so next time we are up, I'm going to grab a bunch of syenite and bedrock and see what I can't do with it.  

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Most all suppliers are willing to do custom mixes, the heavy grog and feldspar chips will be the tough part. However they might be willing to do it last in the production run before they do a cleanout, or when they're running groggy sculpture bodies. It's worth a call to find out.

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Laguna/Axner did whatever you wanted in 1 ton batches-the big stuff may or may not work. They now do smaller batches but the price is higher. This is a call and ask deal and they are closed now for spell -Grogzilla made in SF area has the large chips so its not that big of deal-I think maybe clay planet has grogzilla-check them out on the web.

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Dude,

Time to invest in a pugmill.  We like PP.  PeterPugger VMP30 is a good buy used at around 3-4K, I would say.  Others may jump in with a local variation. 

If you have the market for your, work;

Shoot, buy I new one, we'll all be impressed.

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just a warning, joseph, your pot looks suspiciously like an ancient pot from the Mediterranean.   if you get much better at it, someone will show up on the antique roadshow asking about one of yours.:rolleyes:

Edited by oldlady
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On 3/26/2020 at 9:09 PM, Joseph Fireborn said:

Anyone have any ideas? For now I am just going to continue manually doing it I guess. 

Joseph,

Several years back I was adding dried red/orange clay from my ponds to get some random pizzazz to the boring cone 10 porcelain and white clay bodies.  Standard wedging was a bummer, so I modified the Slam wedging technique to meet my needs.  I took a bag of clay, sliced it into thin slices -- eyeballed somewhere between 1 and 3 cm thickness,   spread the slices on the table,   sprayed water on the slices to get a sheen,   and then sprinkled dry coarse pond clay on each slab.    Starting with the two closest slabs,   I stacked the two slabs together,   slammed the slab onto the table,  placed the slammed lump onto the next slice,   slammed that stack,   and so on until  all the slices with "stuff" was in a single stack,   then did about somewhere between 10 and 15 slams using the standard, cut it in half, stack, slam, repeat sequence.  The red clay was semi-randomly dispersed through out the clay in lumps and smears.    All together, a single 25 pound block of clay was done in less than an hour.   

The water sprayed on each slab was necessary to keep the overall mixture at a constant water level;   without the added water, the clay becames too dry. 

additional wedging would have uniformly distributed the additions  which ruins the contrast of random spots of small red clay lumps against a white background.  

Shortly after playing with that clay, I switched to applying rogue mixtures of clay bodies (wet and dry lumps , rocks, &  powders) to items made with standard studio clay.   Slips are easier to make than wedging dry stuff into clay;   I gained control of where the contrasts take place;  and  I really don't like to spend time wedging -- it's boring. 

LT

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