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We’ve looked at art online, Read articles, watched videos, done critiques, and made home made play dough.

Other unique lessons: Made a PowerPoint that shows steps and compares and contrasts making a draped slab pot out of a repeated shape using clay versus cardboard. The students had to make it out of cardboard pieces and tape draped inside an actual bowl.
 

The students made slab boxes that resembled slices of cake prior to corona virus. Now they have to compare and contrast making cake out of clay versus making a real cake. They need to make a slide presentation along with pictures. There are a surprising amount of similarities.

 

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Well, it's been several weeks now since starting to teach ceramics online.  Here's what has worked: I had students create animal sculptures (which would have been our next project in clay) out of recycled objects.   I really wanted them to continue to have a hands-on experience as much as possible.  Each step of the way, I explained how we would do it with clay (and showed them, as I have clay at home) , and then explain and demo how to do it with found objects.  I emphasize the problem-solving aspect that is the common thread across media.  They built armatures from cardboard, foil, plastic soda bottles, egg cartons, etc. Then built up with paper, then paper mache over, and then paint.  I had one student who created a  4 foot tall giraffe !   And another who made a very beautiful and realistic sculpture of her horse.  Yet another was an ostrich, about 5 inches tall, complete with ribbon "feathers"!  Again, not clay, but a 3D sculptural experience.   

Next assignment was to research animal sculptures through history,  to give them a broader context for their animal sculptures.  I wanted them to see that animals have fascinated artists for millenia.  -i gave them some museum websites and google arts and culture as resources, and  they are curating an animal gallery exhibit  with a theme (ancient Egyptian Animals, Animals with Riders, Lions, are examples they came up with). They are working (virtually of course), in small groups during class time to create a virtual museum exhibit. 

Our next project corresponds with the next project in our clay curriculum - making leatherhard slab containers.  Only now they will be making a cardboard geometric container, and will add texture with found objects.  

My Ceramics 2 class usually would be making a tea set for their final project.  They have gone through the design process, and are now going to construct their tea pot with found objects, cardboard, etc, after learning about art styles , surrealism, and Meret Oppenheim's "Object".    The majority of my students said they preferred to make 3D work rather than watch more videos.  That being said, I have also videotaped myself on the wheel, so they could at least get the demos I would have done for them in class.

(I tried to upload photos of student work, but the files are too big.)

 

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Sounds wonderful! Lucky students. Hope you can reduce the size of a few pics and post them. I use Paint to resize them to 500 pixels-there is a limit, I think maybe 600 but not sure.

 

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If you have cell phone pictures those are easiest to resize and upload. I crop mine to square aspect in the Snapseed app (free, no ads) so they don’t rotate themselves. When I go to upload, my phone asks me what size of file I’d like to use. If you have an old phone that doesn’t do this automatically, you can email the image to yourself and the email program will ask you what size you’d like to send. 

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19 hours ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

what size of file

Callie-I just got the Snapseed app.  Currently I  have to send my pics from my cell phone to my email and then have to download them and then open them in the editing program, all just to resize to make them fit what the forums/gallery will accept. I only have to do that for this site--I can send them "as is" to other people and other sites, such as Facebook, and they go through just fine.  This site always says they are too big. It sounds like Snapseed makes the resizing  much easier & faster.   My question is---what size file do you have to select to get the upload through to the Gallery and/or Forums? The pics below are examples of what I consider a decent size, if that helps any...I would have done the 400-500 pixels thing in Paint to get them to fit.

20190521_140155.jpg

20190521_140548.jpg

Edited by LeeU

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@LeeU Its the amount of data that matters for the upload. I have an iPhone X, and the largest file size I can generate with my phone is about 3 MB. That’s well underneath the upload max of 20 MB for the files you can add to threads like this one. While I could upload my pics unedited, I tend to choose the medium setting to be mindful of folks who might not have the best upload speeds available to them. Snapseed takes information out of the image files in a way that isn’t obvious on a computer screen, but would make a difference if you needed to print them. As far as the gallery goes, I have to poke at it and find out. I will get back to you. 

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Editor window indicates just under one MB for attachemnts; I use snipping tool and file type .jpg to cut down file size. In Windows, press Start key, enter "Snipping Tool"; for MacOS, find "Grab" under utilities?

Overall attachment limit is 48.83 MB (hrrm, hence, purge ...at current rate, in eight years?); looks like long time active contributors have found this limit a'ready!

Looks like album limit is 511 MB, not finding any limit of album count ...that limit likely applies to the album aggregate, not individual pics...

 

834646803_albumlimit.JPG.2e376414903bc8b60a36d33e1db61f8b.JPG

oops, too big!

fsizelimit.JPG

Edited by Hulk
sorry about the bigness

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@Hulk, to reduce the size of the image that is posted, after adding it to your post double left click the image (if using a mouse) or tap on the image within the post. A screen pops up where you can adjust the size, you can make the image as small as you want to. Just change the width and keep the aspect ratio the same. Example picture I went from the large picture (900 px width) down to the small (200 px).

875482918_Imports-1of1(1).thumb.jpeg.aab8e0d8eeb08f5517782943e7ea972f.jpeg1288457707_Imports-1of1(1).thumb.jpeg.b19dbe2a7fdd8d97c7d7474473ad4bea.jpeg

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Hi everyone, I’m a high school ceramics teacher. I have about 180 students go through my program every trimester. I would like to share what I did finishing off this past school year and what I plan to do next year. It may be a long post but hopefully helpful if you are interested! (*My ideas will only work for you if your students have access to a computer and the internet).

 

As of now we are not sending clay home nor do I think the logistics of that would work for my school for firings/recycling/germ safety/clay safety. This past school year I did a lot of the assignments mentioned in other posts: sketches/planning, videos of myself on the pottery wheel, found object sculptures, Andy Goldsworthy nature sculptures, etc. Varying activities week to week.

 

2/3 of my students appreciated the assignments, said they were a fun/creative break, got them away from the computer, different from just the reading and typing in other classes. 1/3 of my students hardly put forth the effort because this was ‘not the class they signed up for’ (meaning they expected to work with clay obviously). I had to assess are these fun activities sustainable for my ceramics program down the line. The answer is no. Yes they offer creative thinking, problem solving, design elements, composition, etc. but there is no connection between them all and they are not true to ceramics (it was basically an Art class, which we already have 5 other sections of). I can have fun activities that are different from other classes but they need to send a small ripple effect on my curriculum not a tsunami of change.

 

Here is my plan for next year which will 90% likely be all online (in person and hybrid are options, but highly unlikely). The overarching idea will be the business side of ceramics. Now, I know this might get push back from the creative potters that want ceramics to be a creative outlet only and not a product. But in this current age, especially the city I live in, this is super relevant. People are developing businesses, we are teaching these real skills in CTE classes, and whether a student decides to sell their art or not they’ll be informed of the steps that it takes. 

 

Possible Assignments: designing and uploading product to a personalized google sites (or wix) page (products will be mostly sketches at this point), developing a brand, what types of products will you make (functional/nonfunctional), developing a style for the trimester that you’ll stick with, product photography (photographing found objects in their house with their phone. Lighting/background/etc.), how to price your work, looking at other contemporary artists and their brands, creating artist statement-shop bio. The creative assignments will be intermingled in there: designing a stiff slab project, designing a combined vessel on the wheel, etc. Vocab and technique (how to’s/videos) will also be included. I was assigning a wide variety of assignments from week to week these past few months but everything seemed so disconnected and each week was a new random idea. So now there will be a purpose to the creative/fun assignments, a logical build up of assignments, to create a ‘business plan’ or a ‘brand’ by the end of the trimester.

 

I will be building these assignments this summer and probably adjusting things that I said above as it is all still in the beginning stages. If anyone is interested in sharing ideas I  have no problem sharing resources that I create with anyone. Obviously this isn’t a perfect solution to teaching ceramics online, but I’m excited about having a plan. I also think with more organization and purpose for the course the students will have more buy in. I want to create resources that I can incorporate when in person instruction resumes, but I don’t want to sit around waiting for it to resume and let my program suffer. In person could resume and then go back to distance learning a month later so I think it’s valuable to create something that is sustainable for an online platform. 

 

Thanks for reading!

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Hi everyone, I’m a high school ceramics teacher. I have about 180 students go through my program every trimester. I would like to share what I did finishing off this past school year and what I plan to do next year. It may be a long post but hopefully helpful if you are interested! (*My ideas will only work for you if your students have access to a computer and the internet).

 

As of now we are not sending clay home nor do I think the logistics of that would work for my school for firings/recycling/germ safety/clay safety. This past school year I did a lot of the assignments mentioned in other posts: sketches/planning, videos of myself on the pottery wheel, found object sculptures, Andy Goldsworthy nature sculptures, etc. Varying activities week to week.

 

2/3 of my students appreciated the assignments, said they were a fun/creative break, got them away from the computer, different from just the reading and typing in other classes. 1/3 of my students hardly put forth the effort because this was ‘not the class they signed up for’ (meaning they expected to work with clay obviously). I had to assess are these fun activities sustainable for my ceramics program down the line. The answer is no. Yes they offer creative thinking, problem solving, design elements, composition, etc. but there is no connection between them all and they are not true to ceramics (it was basically an Art class, which we already have 5 other sections of). I can have fun activities that are different from other classes but they need to send a small ripple effect on my curriculum not a tsunami of change.

 

Here is my plan for next year which will 90% likely be all online (in person and hybrid are options, but highly unlikely). The overarching idea will be the business side of ceramics. Now, I know this might get push back from the creative potters that want ceramics to be a creative outlet only and not a product. But in this current age, especially the city I live in, this is super relevant. People are developing businesses, we are teaching these real skills in CTE classes, and whether a student decides to sell their art or not they’ll be informed of the steps that it takes. 

 

Possible Assignments: designing and uploading product to a personalized google sites (or wix) page (products will be mostly sketches at this point), developing a brand, what types of products will you make (functional/nonfunctional), developing a style for the trimester that you’ll stick with, product photography (photographing found objects in their house with their phone. Lighting/background/etc.), how to price your work, looking at other contemporary artists and their brands, creating artist statement-shop bio. The creative assignments will be intermingled in there: designing a stiff slab project, designing a combined vessel on the wheel, etc. Vocab and technique (how to’s/videos) will also be included. I was assigning a wide variety of assignments from week to week these past few months but everything seemed so disconnected and each week was a new random idea. So now there will be a purpose to the creative/fun assignments, a logical build up of assignments, to create a ‘business plan’ or a ‘brand’ by the end of the trimester.

 

I will be building these assignments this summer and probably adjusting things that I said above as it is all still in the beginning stages. If anyone is interested in sharing ideas I  have no problem sharing resources that I create with anyone. Obviously this isn’t a perfect solution to teaching ceramics online, but I’m excited about having a plan. I also think with more organization and purpose for the course the students will have more buy in. I want to create resources that I can incorporate when in person instruction resumes, but I don’t want to sit around waiting for it to resume and let my program suffer. In person could resume and then go back to distance learning a month later so I think it’s valuable to create something that is sustainable for an online platform. 

 

Thanks for reading!

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We've just received our schedule for reopening in August. I teach in California and our Covid spikes are high. Despite that, teachers and students will be expected to go back to start school using one of two models, full online, or hybrid. The hybrid model has two cohorts, A and B. Teachers have a the same student load of 175 students. Half will be online only, while the other half will be in class and online. Without getting too technical with the scheduling, those attending class will have a combined in-class instruction of about 1 1/2 hrs. Which is not enough time to start and complete a project if they only get to do ceramics approx. one day a week. I too, have been wrestling with the possibility of my students not receiving a "full" ceramics experience. I've had to completely redo my curriculum to accommodate online instruction and limited class instruction. In addition to these changes another colleague from another HS and I have decided to create an anti-racist art curriculum (we do that anyway as art teachers incorporating artists of varying backgrounds, gender, etc.) and follow a guideline and commitment that utilizes more artists of color (75% or more), non-western art and artists, and gender equality. I also realized that I will have to make the most of content by teaching my units through themes. These themes coincide with our current social and political climate and reinforce social/emotional learning and engagement. Themes like Place, Purpose, Justice, Change, Legacy, etc. are broad themes in which students will be tasked a variety of activities, projects, discussions, critiques, etc.

I look at this time as an opportunity to engage students in other ways, while not being able to experience a "full" ceramics classroom, students will focus on three-dimensional design, with a series of small ceramic projects and mixed media. Our district's student population is low-income, and work spaces and access will be a challenge. As I was reading this topic threads, every teacher has a different scenario that they are dealing with.  In March, I had students work on an Andy Goldsworthy Environmental Art Installation, which was successful, but realized that I probably could have used an person of color or female even, as an example. And there are plenty of examples, one just has to look. So these March projects will be re-vamped and utilize more persons of color to tie into the themes mentioned earlier.  

Let me clarify, this curriculum is more experimental than "official" or mandated. I don't believe just anyone can just teach an anti-racist curriculum. I have volunteered to many online webinars on racial justice, inclusive classrooms, book clubs, Teaching Tolerance, etc. Being informed to the culture and climate, I believe, will strengthen my curriculum and engage students in ways that adapt to our current situation. I'm working on my website right now and hope to share that soon!

Teaching formats I used in March using Google Classroom:

  • Projects (various clay and non-clay projects utilizing 3D design)
  • Presentations (video, Tik Tok, Power Points, and other social media and learning platforms)
  • Padlet (collaboration, topic discussions in real-time, Google chat.)
  • Illustrations (planning, preparation, research, understanding form, scavenger hunts, hand-eye-coordination, Pinterest, etc.)
  • Artist Critiques (Padlet)

 

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Hello all. I am a high school ceramics teacher. The end of last year was a complete disaster and I basically spent most of my time creating power point lessons that involve specific techniques linked to contemporary artist work in that style.
 

This coming year I will be allowed to make bagged “kits” to hand out to my student so that they can work at home. My thought is to bag small amounts of clay as well as 2-3 essential tools for students to take home. Then I will be filming myself doing demos as well as connecting with my students via zoom regularly. Students will put the completed project back in the bag when it is finished and drop it off at the school studio. Is anyone else doing this for their students? What do you think the  3 essential tools should be besides clay of course. Is anyone else doing this for their students? Any advice or feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

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On 7/7/2020 at 6:18 AM, Ibel Sinohuiz said:

We've just received our schedule for reopening in August. I teach in California and our Covid spikes are high. Despite that, teachers and students will be expected to go back to start school using one of two models, full online, or hybrid. The hybrid model has two cohorts, A and B. Teachers have a the same student load of 175 students. Half will be online only, while the other half will be in class and online. Without getting too technical with the scheduling, those attending class will have a combined in-class instruction of about 1 1/2 hrs. Which is not enough time to start and complete a project if they only get to do ceramics approx. one day a week. I too, have been wrestling with the possibility of my students not receiving a "full" ceramics experience. I've had to completely redo my curriculum to accommodate online instruction and limited class instruction. In addition to these changes another colleague from another HS and I have decided to create an anti-racist art curriculum (we do that anyway as art teachers incorporating artists of varying backgrounds, gender, etc.) and follow a guideline and commitment that utilizes more artists of color (75% or more), non-western art and artists, and gender equality. I also realized that I will have to make the most of content by teaching my units through themes. These themes coincide with our current social and political climate and reinforce social/emotional learning and engagement. Themes like Place, Purpose, Justice, Change, Legacy, etc. are broad themes in which students will be tasked a variety of activities, projects, discussions, critiques, etc.

I look at this time as an opportunity to engage students in other ways, while not being able to experience a "full" ceramics classroom, students will focus on three-dimensional design, with a series of small ceramic projects and mixed media. Our district's student population is low-income, and work spaces and access will be a challenge. As I was reading this topic threads, every teacher has a different scenario that they are dealing with.  In March, I had students work on an Andy Goldsworthy Environmental Art Installation, which was successful, but realized that I probably could have used an person of color or female even, as an example. And there are plenty of examples, one just has to look. So these March projects will be re-vamped and utilize more persons of color to tie into the themes mentioned earlier.  

Let me clarify, this curriculum is more experimental than "official" or mandated. I don't believe just anyone can just teach an anti-racist curriculum. I have volunteered to many online webinars on racial justice, inclusive classrooms, book clubs, Teaching Tolerance, etc. Being informed to the culture and climate, I believe, will strengthen my curriculum and engage students in ways that adapt to our current situation. I'm working on my website right now and hope to share that soon!

Teaching formats I used in March using Google Classroom:

  • Projects (various clay and non-clay projects utilizing 3D design)
  • Presentations (video, Tik Tok, Power Points, and other social media and learning platforms)
  • Padlet (collaboration, topic discussions in real-time, Google chat.)
  • Illustrations (planning, preparation, research, understanding form, scavenger hunts, hand-eye-coordination, Pinterest, etc.)
  • Artist Critiques (Padlet)

 

I also teach in California  in a very diverse but low income high school. I am often include multi cultural awareness and social justice in my projects and lessons. I will be able to hand out small batches of clay and limited tools this year for home instruction. Can your students bring clay home ?

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On 7/20/2020 at 2:23 PM, Johanna Herrera said:

Hello all. I am a high school ceramics teacher. The end of last year was a complete disaster and I basically spent most of my time creating power point lessons that involve specific techniques linked to contemporary artist work in that style.
 

This coming year I will be allowed to make bagged “kits” to hand out to my student so that they can work at home. My thought is to bag small amounts of clay as well as 2-3 essential tools for students to take home. Then I will be filming myself doing demos as well as connecting with my students via zoom regularly. Students will put the completed project back in the bag when it is finished and drop it off at the school studio. Is anyone else doing this for their students? What do you think the  3 essential tools should be besides clay of course. Is anyone else doing this for their students? Any advice or feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

I teach in Iowa, and as of now, we are set on being in person starting August 24th.

I am going to have plans ready for all our potential scenarios; In-Person, Hybrid and Digital/ Online Learning.  If we are Online Only, I have been assured that students will be coming in to pick up materials.  Essentially, they have to as we are providing Chromebooks for all of them.  So for my 2-D classes, I can have a "package" of materials ready to go, to get us through multiple units.  My Photography class is a bit trickier, as we still shoot film, and actually start by the students building their own pinhole camera.  For my clay work class, I was going to initially just have the students go over terminology, and work on their project sketches, but I'm leaning more towards sending clay and tools home with them.  I already have tool sets, that I give the students normally, so that part is already set up.  I could just send a block of clay home.  Not ideal, and the parents might not like it, but it's an option!

On 7/20/2020 at 3:34 PM, Roberta12 said:

Let me just say, bless you all for what you are doing.  You all deserve a million dollar salary.  Thank you for being teachers.  I mean that from the bottom of my soul.

Roberta

I keep asking for a million dollar salary, but the Administration just chuckles and walks away...

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On 7/20/2020 at 12:23 PM, Johanna Herrera said:

Hello all. I am a high school ceramics teacher. The end of last year was a complete disaster and I basically spent most of my time creating power point lessons that involve specific techniques linked to contemporary artist work in that style.
 

This coming year I will be allowed to make bagged “kits” to hand out to my student so that they can work at home. My thought is to bag small amounts of clay as well as 2-3 essential tools for students to take home. Then I will be filming myself doing demos as well as connecting with my students via zoom regularly. Students will put the completed project back in the bag when it is finished and drop it off at the school studio. Is anyone else doing this for their students? What do you think the  3 essential tools should be besides clay of course. Is anyone else doing this for their students? Any advice or feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

Hi Johanna,

I am in California and doing the same. Here are my ‘tool kits’ for the semester.

Ceramics 1: clay approx. 15lb, extra bag for scraps, fishing line, 2 popsicle sticks, 1 paper clip, (they’ll cut 1 stick at an angle if they want to make a modeling tool or just leave it. We’ll tape the opened paper clip to the end of the other one for a needle tool) 5oz of underglaze, pillowcase (for working on), 12” round dowel for rolling slabs (I ordered 1” round by 48” on amazon and cut them in fourths). Additionally I’ll show them how to make a rubber rib tool out of maybe an old gift card or something..

Ceramics 2: same tools, clay 25lb

Ceramics 3: same tools as above,  clay 25lb, + 1-2oz mason stain powder to either mix in clay for a project or mix in slip for decoration.

 

We have a very large ceramics program so that may be more clay than most use so you would just lessen the projects and size of projects. 
 

There will be 2 drop off days. They’ll be bringing two projects each time. Then they’ll pick them all up the week before finals. I will offer to dip glaze projects as a ‘surprise’ color if they want. I will clear dip any under glazed projects. For the rest they will pick up unglazed and they can paint with acrylic or wait until later years to glaze themselves when we are back.

 

They will submit final photos of greenware. They can then save it to bring to be fired or recycle it and use it to make another project more detailed or larger.
 

We’ll be heavily going over clay recycling the first weeks. Even once school resumes in person we may have to modify our use of communal trash bins for scraps so it will be important for each student to know how to take care of their own clay.
 

Hope that helps!

Edited by TLH
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