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Hello,

Due to the coronavirus/ new shelter in place policy, I am now coming up with an online curriculum for my high school ceramic's students. At the moment, my students do not have clay at home (there was not any time to prepare for this) but I am considering having them pick up clay once the shelter in place is lifted. This is such a crazy situation though and I am concerned that projects may be contaminated with the virus and I don't want to risk handling them so they can be put in the kiln. There is also the predicament of not having enough tools and glazes to distribute to 100 students. I am considering telling students we will no longer be working with clay...but wow, what a bummer. I can imagine it will get depressing reading articles and watching videos about ceramics without being able to ever touch clay. I am wondering what other ceramic's teachers are doing in this situation. Do we completely derail and just turn it into an art class where we can have more options to have them work with drawing, photography, found objects, and explore concepts? I would love to hear from other high school ceramics teachers on how they plan on moving forward.

Thanks,

Demetra

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I'm a retired art teacher.  There were times when I brought students in on problem solving process and this may be the time since the clay will be in their home.   If you gave them just one pound of clay, what would they create using hand building techniques?   Where and how would they set up for easy clean up.  What items do they have at home that could be used as basic tools?  How will they keep the clay moist when not working with it?   How will they set up a drying space,and at some point, how will this be transported to school for firing.      Make sure parents sign off on this plan.

Schools are sending meals home. Why not a pound of clay?

Just a thought

 

 

Edited by karenkstudio

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4 hours ago, karenkstudio said:

I'm a retired art teacher.  There were times when I brought students in on problem solving process and this may be the time since the clay will be in their home.   If you gave them just one pound of clay, what would they create using hand building techniques?   Where and how would they set up for easy clean up.  What items do they have at home that could be used as basic tools?  How will they keep the clay moist when not working with it?   How will they set up a drying space,and at some point, how will this be transported to school for firing.      Make sure parents sign off on this plan.

Schools are sending meals home. Why not a pound of clay?

Just a thought

 

 

Sounds positive. I would even think of giving them an assortment of ideas for shapes that would require they research a few how to videos and then build their project.

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I also teach high school ceramics and have been told by my administrators that I cannot send clay home.  I am struggling with how to make the rest of the semester engaging and meaningful, with some actual hands-on 3D experiences for my students, in addition to the obvious watching videos and critiquing them.  

Here's what I have come up with so far:

1. creating works in my home studio, videotaping my works in progress, and then having them critique my technique ( i will do some "bad " examples as well as good techniques, so they can visually see the difference. ) yes, I know it's a video, but not a youtube!

2. speaking of youtube, though, " The Great Pottery Throw Down 'is a must-see reality TV show from BBC, where potters hone their skills with different, usually wheel-based clay challenges.   I plan on assigning some of these episodes to my students. check it out!  I binge-watched all of the seasons!

3. go on a digital field trip - check out Google Cultural Arts institute for virtual tours of museums around the world - and have the students curate their own ceramics exhibit in a powerpoint or google slide presentation. they or you! can choose a theme, time period, object (cups through history, coil forms through history, vase forms, surface decoration, examples of scraffitto, etc)

4. some ideas that are not directly utilizing clay, but will give a 3D experience:

         -  create Andy Goldsworthy -style sculptures and photograph and upload to google classroom

        -  use found objects/recyclable materials from their recycle bin (empty cereal boxes, plastic caps and bottles, etc) to create an armature to then paper mache over.  wheat paste can easily be made for paper mache.  themes might include animals ( I usually have my ceramics 1 students create an animal sculpture, so I think I will do this), or a high relief animal bust, or a 2D version of a master artist's painting, or....

        - i am contemplating having them make a salt dough recipe, just so they can practice the techniques we haven't gotten to yet.  I must say I am ambivalent about this, as it seems so "elementary school",  yet I think it would be therapeutic for them to actual wedge it and form it, and have some familiarity with clay as a medium.  Plus it's non-toxic.  And there are some pretty elaborate examples out there, of artists who have chosen to work with salt dough as a way of working in "clay" without a kiln, and with a low budget.          salt dough ideas include :  coil forms (wrap around a glass jar, which can be baked in the oven);  personal adornments - personalized pendant with symbols that represent themselves; earrings, bracelets, using patterns, stamping, piercing. these can be painted, or dyed with food coloring in process or "painted" after forming; patchwork platter - texture smaller slabs of clay and join/slump them into a plate or platter form; animal sculptures

 

That's all I've got for now.  I hope this helps to get your creative juices flowing!   Please let's keep the conversation going.  And remember - we can do this - we are creatives - we are best-equipped to think outside the box!

 

 

 

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Our school system has instructed us to prepare "enrichment" activities.  There will be no consequence if students do not do them and we are not to grade them.  Sooooooooooooooooooooo.  I think the only way I can get them to do anything is to make it fun.  I found a page that includes a number of games to do with clay.  I haven't heard for sure, but I don't see any reason I won't be able to send home a pound of clay.  https://artsandactivities.com/creativity-exercises-and-games-with-clay/    the page lists standards so it's possible to verify that you are actually adhering to ceramic standards and prove that you know what you are doing.  'Cause all we do is play in clay all day, right??  lol

 

 

 

 

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I am so glad this forum was suggested to me!  I have 2 classes of ceramics that have no way of getting clay. My class was 100% hands on so thank you baxter@fullchannel.net for the ideas.

I'll report back after trying some of the activities.

Thanks!

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I teach high school pottery.  They don’t have clay and won’t have it.  I said they can use play dough or paper mache (or whatever) if they want to or can.  Not all of my students will have the dough option but I love that idea! I will send them a recipe on the next round. (BTW.. my classes are about 90% boys)

I am having them do a sculptural plan with sketches from front, back, sides and top  and explanations, expected problems etc.

And I’m brainstorming about having them make plans for an over the top Rube Goldberg type toilet or sink.   

But that takes me through 2 weeks!   I love The Great Pottery Throw Down  idea but what about the kids without internet?

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I teach senior adults under a community college which offers zero unit ceramics courses in a Health services program.  With  the corona virus shutdown, I've  discussed  with another ceramics instructor the idea of having students work outside of the studio.  We discussed a major safety issue and we've decided not to encourage working outside of the studio environment.  The students can no longer go to a studio that's well-equipped that has safety rules, offers buying clay, clay tools, equipment like potters wheels and a slab roller, glazes and kilns.  The safety issue is wherever each student is working with clay at home, it maybe the kitchen, the patio, garage, etc.., will a student be able to control the making and inhaling of clay dust?  

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Brakers Good Earth Clays has posted a page of teaching ceramic online resources. It includes an NCECA presentation from Dara Green using the Flipped Classroom model (the video is just talking at the beginning so it might look like there are no images but they start after a couple minutes). Lots of other links to online lectures, Google classroom, assignments etc.

Link is here.

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I'm in the same situation: high school ceramics classes, from home, no clay. I started in with the Great Pottery Throw Down this week. Today, I'll see what their first reactions are like. I found the quality of the videos for that show on YouTube to be much better quality on Season 2, so I started with that.  Here's the link to my KWL chart for Episode 1 in case that's helpful to anyone: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yNREgTa83QmrL1NjrkW3pBuip42zEG46xRvNgmACIc8/edit?usp=sharing

I'm thinking about having them use free 3D modeling tools to create pots that way and then perhaps Pixlr to "glaze" them digitally. 

I'm looking forward to hearing more ideas from other teachers. 

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OK,  I started with the Great Pottery Throw Down, and did 2 episodes with questions for them. It was all going well till I got a message from a student that the episodes have been taken down. I just checked and it's true.  All episodes have been removed from youtube and even the BBC websites! Why in the world would they do that? There goes the only part of this online teaching in which I felt completely confident.  (*#!#?!&!)

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i am not a teacher but i remember seeing teaching videos on websites for manufacturers of commercial glazes.   i think amaco, mayco and duncan if i remember correctly.  might be useful.

and, i think someone who has a small  midwest supply store has some as well.   could it be clay lady?  yes!   i just looked and found a number of her videos.   no idea of the quality.

Edited by oldlady

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9 hours ago, baxter@fullchannel.net said:

I was dismayed to find that the Great Pottery Throw Down episodes were taken down, too.  Arghh!  I am thinking I will contact the BBC and beg them to release them !

The most recent series wasn't on BBC.  It was on 4.  (Don't know if this will work outside of the UK tho').

https://www.channel4.com/programmes/the-great-pottery-throw-down/on-demand/70230-001

 

Edited by Chilly

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I teach high school ceramics and have been engaged in remote learning for 3 weeks now in NY Hudson  Valley. First,  I started with the great pottery throw down... that however has been taken down due to copyright infringement policies and laws...:( so sad  about this as my students loved it! So did I!

Next lesson,  I made believe they were designers and they were Commissioned  to design a wash basin for Kohler inc... They had to submit 3 view points and other details about their piece. I got them drawing , designing and problem solving.

The third assignment I based on Andy Goldsworthy.  Not clay but they will get outside use their  hands and build something. I also assigned them to find their favorite Goldsworthy post it, comment why they like it and then how could they incorporate the design into a ceramic piece?  This willalso become a drawing for a future piece I hope!  They also really seem to enjoy his work.   That’s it so far... hope this helps...  

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I am a high school art teacher struggling to come up with a hands on experience for my ceramics class. For the first few weeks I had them reading a scholastic art magazine about form and function. I feel terrible that they aren't getting to work with clay. I desperately want to get them back to being creative and thank you for all of your tips. I too was going to explore the salt dough clay, but I don't know if everyone will have access to flour. I am thinking of have two options based on materials available. I plan to ask about sending clay home, I did pack up supply bags for my drawing and painting class, so I am hoping to maybe get this going as well. I am super disappointed about the Great Pottery Throw Down. I have never seen it (I only had netflix until recently when I added youtube tv.) I wonder if there is a way we can get that resource back? Thank you and I will keep checking back to see what else everyone comes up with and hopefully to add some ideas for you all. Stay well.

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I teach high school and am planning on getting my kids each a pound of non drying modeling clay and they can turn in pictures and reuse material (and keep it). For a final I am having them look at the Getty project of "stage your favorite painting with items from home and photograph it. "(someone texted me images from the Getty site).

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Way back when I was taking an Arts & Crafts class we used white bread and white glue to create a modeling paste. After creating the piece we let it dry then used acrylics to paint it.

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I am a high school ceramics teacher. i originally sent my students home with a bag of clay (5lbs)  but that was used up in the first week. What i have been doing is finding short Youtube videos of potters and writing up questions to be answered. Some questions are openended personal opinions. It has become like an Art History class only for clay. A series  of short movies made by Goldmark  are very good. i have found videos on Mark Hewitt, Mike Dodd, Jane white , Warren Makenzie, Randy Johnson, Joel Queen, Grace Lee, Paul Soldner and more. I am ready to try some other ideas. I like the Andy Goldsworthy one. I also have given points to any student who finds a cool idea online to share 

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Hello everyone,

I also am a high school ceramics teacher -25+ years-no clay to take home for students-and same.....was going to use The Great Pottery Throwdown.... but as we know....so I have taken your suggestions and info and  created some lessons from it and our curriculum director just shared this wonderful site  with me that is on Youtube.  It is Artrageous with Nate. It is awesome. Go under Videos at the top and you will find a plethora of wonderful information. The videos are the perfect length and are in all art content areas. I am going to use the Pizza box one - it is very cool.  But there are so many of them-Dali, Warhol, etc. Another short little video I found is LorienStern.com. Google that and then go to ABOUT and hit the video. I think the high school age will enjoy this one. I also gave them a Google Slideshow of any student projects that I have taken pics of and then had them critique the one that stood out to them. I compiled all the critiques and emailed them to the respective student that made the project. They enjoyed that too. So, just some more ideas- we are all in this together. Good luck !

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The activities I have created for my ceramic high school students (without clay) during this time is; developing skills to be creative, curious, seek questions, acquire ideas & play.

Learning Target; Artists are Innovative & creative; students viewed a Ted Talk https://www.ted.com/talks/janet_echelman_taking_imagination_seriously?language=en

Learning Target; I can be creative, I had students explore you-tube sites of making sculptures with what they had in the house, Tin foil is great, I had students take pictures and send them to me. Most creative, pieces of bread, dry spaghetti and a gummy bear, birthday cards standing up to form a star, fruit.

Learning Target; Analyze visual art; I had students read 2 different explanation of Nighthawks compare them then find a parody of it. Asked students how they have been creative.

Learning Target; determine messages communicated by an image; Presented a power point of 5 artworks that have been created in response to virus (kept it positive) had students look at images respond, then read what it was about, many were surprised by the intent and meaning. Students then took their own pictures and shared what their intent was.

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One resource I have used is Revolutions of the Wheel.  It covers the beginning of contemporary ceramic history.  Each segment is 20 minutes and if you purchase the video it comes with a synopsis and questions.  However, it is on YouTube and you could come up with your own questions.  It's a bit dry but informative.  My students love learning about George Ohr and I show them a piece of Antiques Road Show to give them an idea of how art can appreciate.  

I am struggling for relevant hands on ideas that are engaging and meaningful.  Sketchbooks have been my go to.  My students do not have funds to purchase or have many materials on hand.

I appreciate the shared info and I have new ideas. 

Thank you!

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