Jump to content

QotW: When you repair do you use the manufacturer parts or out of house part?


Recommended Posts

Hi folks, another question from Pres, as there seems to be nothing new in the question pool. 

When you repair( equipment, like a wheel, kiln or other equipment) do you use the manufacturers parts or do you use out of house parts(from another parts supplier)?  I have gone both routes when repairing equipment over the years. In the long run, ordering things like elements from a second hand house ended up to be more of a hassle than the savings was worth, and at the same time it seemed I was burning elements faster. As far as belts, one of the wheels I had would use a V-belt from an auto parts store. I also found rubber drive pucks for my motorized kick wheel at an industrial parts store. In the long run though, I have found that the support with the manufacturer and quality of parts was best bang for the buck in house. What have you experiences been?

So once again question of the week:  When you repair do you use the manufacturer parts or out of house part?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Pres said:

Hi folks, another question from Pres, as there seems to be nothing new in the question pool. 

When you repair( equipment, like a wheel, kiln or other equipment) do you use the manufacturers parts or do you use out of house parts(from another parts supplier)?  I have gone both routes when repairing equipment over the years. In the long run, ordering things like elements from a second hand house ended up to be more of a hassle than the savings was worth, and at the same time it seemed I was burning elements faster. As far as belts, one of the wheels I had would use a V-belt from an auto parts store. I also found rubber drive pucks for my motorized kick wheel at an industrial parts store. In the long run though, I have found that the support with the manufacturer and quality of parts was best bang for the buck in house. What have you experiences been?

So once again question of the week:  When you repair do you use the manufacturer parts or out of house part?

I like OEM for elements or at least known very high quality elements by others, even when more costly. For proprietary stuff, knobs, handles, etc... probably the manufacture. Grooved bricks, OEM for sure.  For products they don’t produce themselves, relays I can buy equal or in many cases superior. For wire and connectors I will often buy superior because it’s available and I have specific knowledge it is common in other industries. For the simplest of things That are costly for the manufacture to build in all their kilns but simple for me to do a single kiln, say a rusty #8 sheet metal screw, it probably just gets replaced with a #10 stainless.

So I guess to answer your question, both -  always trying to replace with anything reasonably known superior so  hopefully I don’t have to revisit it in the near future.

Edited by Bill Kielb
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on the piece of equipment and the part. Many manufacturers of pottery equipment; wheels kilns, slab rollers, etc,  use stock parts that are also used in the manufacture of other items, industrial equipment and more.  I agree when it comes to elements. My experience with third party elements over the years has been inconsistent and years ago I decided to only use elements manufactured by the kiln maker. However, fuses, drive belts, bearings, motors, status lights, switches,  insulated wire, switches, electrical connectors, and other parts are often available from other sources.. The key to success is to be sure that the replacement part is either an identical part or a direct replacement. If you aren't confident in your own knowledge, or experience, or that of the source of the replacement part, your only option is  the manufacturer of the equipment that you're repairing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to tinker so I always try to reverse engineer anything I use.  Doesn't always turn out well, but I feel like I understand what I'm doing a lot better once I've tinkered with it.  In my head, everything can be fixed and companies do not invent things.  That means anything can be fixed if it's not some kind of structural deficit.

When I tell people that, so many people say yeah you can fix anything yourself but it's not worth the time.  Well I guess that depends on your definition of worth?  If knowledge is worthless then I agree!  In that case ignorance is bliss.  But if you find value in knowledge then any experience repairing or maintaining your equipment is priceless.

So this is sort of in the same vein as last week... If I can see a path, I will take it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When it comes to kiln elements I always go with OEM. Each company makes their elements a little differently, and having their specific elements in the kiln can help with diagnosing problems because they know how it should be working. I use OEM bricks, of course, because they won't line up well otherwise. Beyond that, everything else on a kiln is off the shelf stuff. All the switches, relays, wiring, etc can be purchased elsewhere. Some things I can get cheaper from the kiln manufacturer, some things I can't .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OEM, third party, (may I add) used/repurposed, or (also adding) fabricated part(s) - depends; I have and will weigh the factors and try to make the best decision.

Hi Ken! Your question probably belongs in its own thread under Equipment Use and Repair topic. Replacing a switch, my guess would be that the replacement switch should match up in terms of amperage rating. Could you supply the model number, voltage and amperage of your kiln, and perhaps some pics as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Usually try to get locally, sometimes from auto shops. Used a hockey puck for a new drive wheel on an Estrin powerd Kick wheel.

Met a person the other day visiting here that had made my Kiln elements and claimed he worked on Building the Estrin wheels for the Vancouver school board.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Pres unpinned this topic

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.