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High Fire Yellow Slip


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I work in a university studio, and while I can use an electric kiln and fire to cone 5-6, I like the look of dark clays fired to cone 10 reduction in the gas kiln.  Lately I've  been experimenting with mishima and have had luck with red and blue stains added to white slip.  I'd like to be able to add yellow to the palate.  The Mason brand Canary Yellow  burnt out to off white at cone 10.  Is there a stain (Mason or other brand) or an oxide that is more likely to survive at that high temp?   I'm using this on the outside of covered jars, so food safety is not a major issue.  If uranium is the only choice, I'll learn to love off white.

Cynthia

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mason makes a lot of yellow stains.   if you call them on the telephone, you can talk to someone who could advise you which ones might work with your particular clay.   just ask for a technical person.  they are very helpful.

i have used vanadium pentoxide for yellow.  recently read here that it is toxic but i have not researched it myself.

update:   highly toxic if breathed in or ingested.

in addition, praseodymium is another one that makes brighter yellow.

Edited by oldlady
clarity
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Mason reference chart here, have a look at what is in the stain you tried and compare it to the others. Look for other stains that contain different ingredients than what is in the Canary Yellow. I would definitely stay away from making a uranium yellow.

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You might think about the Yellow Salt glaze if not a slip.  You'll have to run some tests to find the right thickness.

Coleman has brushwork but I didn't see yellow slip

This is a yellow stain at cone 10 reduction.  It's in Soldate 60 slip on the same body.  Not really cheap and again, you'll 871454101_yellowstainresize.jpg.4c5eaa4513371e00f04ec8060f90a750.jpg

Again.  Cone 10 reduction.  Probably be a nice yellow on a very white stoneware or porcelain. 

have to find the right strenght.

Edited by CactusPots
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I can tell you from personal experience that the yellow praseodymium stain burns out in cone ten reduction. I think it’s more the reduction than the temperature that kills it: the cone 7 I fire to in oxidation isn’t a lot cooler than cone ten, and there’s no evidence of the same stain having issues in my electric. 

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2 minutes ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

I can tell you from personal experience that the yellow praseodymium stain burns out in cone ten reduction. I think it’s more the reduction than the temperature that kills it: the cone 7 I fire to in oxidation isn’t a lot cooler than cone ten, and there’s no evidence of the same stain having issues in my electric. 

Yes, if you look at the mason chart almost every yellow stain can go to 2300.  But unfortunately there is no recommendation between reduction and oxidation on their chart because they assume oxidation.

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