Jump to content
char wheat

Big Shot Glaze in a bottle

Recommended Posts

A few years ago I bought 4 bottles of glaze from a gentleman who had posted on Facebook.  These glazes were for spraying just using a pump sprayer.  I was not able to test them out at the time as we were living in an apartment and I had no facility to do clay.  I have since moved in a nice house with a small building in back for my studio.  I tried each of the four glazes and I really really like them.  So much that I want to buy more. But I can't seem to find them now.  I searched with bing and nothing showed up I even tried looking it up on Facebook. Has anyone here heard of a pump spray in a bottle?  If so please let me know.  Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Neil.  That is not quite the same as the ones I got, but it looks like it would work quite well.  I have the sprayer.  What I am looking for is the glazes that were formulated to be thin enough for spraying like that.  They are quite watery in the bottle, but even one sprayed on coat gives great results. I will take some photos of the glaze bottles tomorrow and post them on here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Neil I did not know that.  So I could thin out the commercial brushing glazes?  I knew I could thin down the glazes that I made, but not every glaze.  If you thin down the commercial brushing glaze how many coats of spray would you need to give good coverage?  Even at the rather thick and creamy state they recommend 3 brushing coats.  So would I need to spray 6 or so to get the coverage?  

Charlotte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, char wheat said:

Thanks Neil I did not know that.  So I could thin out the commercial brushing glazes?  I knew I could thin down the glazes that I made, but not every glaze.  If you thin down the commercial brushing glaze how many coats of spray would you need to give good coverage?  Even at the rather thick and creamy state they recommend 3 brushing coats.  So would I need to spray 6 or so to get the coverage?  

Charlotte

Pre-mixed wet glazes have a higher water content than glazes you mix yourself. That's part of what makes them brushable. So when you thin them down so they're runny enough to spray, you'll have a lower content of glaze material in the mix than compared to glazes made from dry mix. So you'll probably need a couple extra coats to get the thickness right. It'll all depend on the glaze itself as to how many more coats. Test, test, test.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Neil I did not know that.  So I could thin out the commercial brushing glazes?  I knew I could thin down the glazes that I made, but not every glaze.  If you thin down the commercial brushing glaze how many coats of spray would you need to give good coverage?  Even at the rather thick and creamy state they recommend 3 brushing coats.  So would I need to spray 6 or so to get the coverage?  

Charlotte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you very much Neil.  I am trying to get away from brushing since my old hands don't work as good as they used to and I find it difficult to make an even coat with no brush strokes.  Spraying is much easier and gives a better result. in my opinion.  

Charlotte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, char wheat said:

Spraying is much easier and gives a better result. in my opinion.  

Just a little reminder to be safe while spraying glazes. Even though the ones you are using come in little pump bottles you still need to wear a P100 mask and either spray outdoors or use a spray-booth with a proper exhaust fan. Apologies if you already know this but thought it should be mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

char wheat, i spray glaze all the time.   i would have a very hard time if i had to physically pump the spray out of a bottle.   using windex is difficult for my almost 80 year old hands.

the word "spraying" means different things to different people.   i would never water down a glaze to spray it. i cannot  imagine using a 200 mesh screen, i only have 60 mesh sieves and they are fine.   i do not spray from a great distance as some people do.  i use whatever glaze i like without regard to the ingredients even though some people think you cannot.  you need to do whatever is comfortable and works on the pot.   maybe it will be a pump bottle if that suits you.  maybe you do not have room or expect to do much glazing.  but, if you want to do more, i will tell you what has worked for me.

a simple siphon glaze that is powered by a compressor is the easiest and least expensive that i have found.   the EZE sprayer is about $30 and works well since the pipe is a large size and the spray outlet can be adjusted to handle any thickness within reason.  compressors can be bought used for little money.   small ones do not work well because the spray gun runs for a longer time than the manufacturer of the compressor planned.   one compressor i used for many years (8 gallon) died and i got a bigger one because it was on sale locally.  i have another (8 gallon) that dates back to the 1950s and i got used from craigslist for less than $50.

you mentioned spraying several coats on a pot.  if it has been thinned down with water and you have gotten the pot soaking wet, i can see why you might need to do that.   if you leave the glaze as it is and spray it once with a siphon sprayer it will not wet the pot at all and you can handle the pot immediately after putting down the sprayer.    it takes a little while to recognize the amount you need to spray but that is just a normal learning curve.  using a banding wheel slowly allows you to cover the pot  in several revolutions, monitoring the change in color from just sprayed to coming back for a second time so you can keep track of your work. 

sorry, i could go on forever but you probably have stopped reading this already.

 

Edited by oldlady
correction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I do know about the precautions to take with spraying glazes.  I use a face mask much like the one in your picture.  I have made a small spray booth so I don't spray the neighborhood. The sprayer I am using which really works well and hardly requires any hand or finger pressure  (my old hands are 76) is one that was intended for luminance make-up.  I saw an ad on late night TV and thought that looks like it would be great for glazes, and it is.  Its a  small airbrush with a small compressor but it has been working great for my use. The make-up that came with it got chucked into a box never to be seen again. LOL  The only glazes so far that I have used in it were the Big Shot Glazes mentioned above.  But after hearing from Neil and other great potters on here I am going to try spraying some of my other glazes and run some test tiles and see what works.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have finally  tracked down who the glazes I am referring to made them. His name is James Henderson and he lives in Philadelphia. If any of you know him please ask him to contact me.  Thank you so much..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"...the amount you need to spray but that is just a normal learning curve."

Aye that! Try cutting a piece of masking tape - I use small squares, which turned a bit, becomes a "diamond" accent - if peeled up carefully, the edges remain sharp, and the thickness of the glaze coat then readily apparent. Wax before pulling the tape for filling with contrast, or just fill with same glaze to hide't, or leave bare clay, or...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.