Jump to content
Brandon Franks

Black vs Green Nickel Oxide

Recommended Posts

Okay so this is confusing the hell out of me because there are not that many articles about it.

 

All recipes I have call for black nickel oxide. I don't have it, I have green and black is hard to get around me.

 

However,

The density of black is higher than green, but the oxide weight is higher in the green. So, say a recipe calls for 4% black, if I do 4% green, it should be almost equal, right?

 

I had a straight conversion list for oxides, but it fell on my kiln and burned... karma for constantly rushing pots, I guess...

 

https://digitalfire.com/4sight/material/nickel_oxide_green_1967.html

https://digitalfire.com/4sight/material/nickel_oxide_black_1074.html

 

Thanks,

Brandon

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just use the same amount of green nickel oxide as you would use black nickel oxide. If you use nickel carbonate then you need 1 1/2 times as much of that to equal either black or green nickel oxide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's more like 1 and a 1/3rd as much nickel carbonate.  It's 64% NiO whereas black nickel oxide is 90% NiO.  Could be wrong though.

I've never even seen green nickel oxide but apparently it's 100% NiO

Edited by liambesaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, glazenerd said:

Brandon:

Black nickel oxide is pure, and green is carbonated. Carbonated by US standards means 40% oxide with 60% fluff (carbo)ate.

Nickel ii oxide is green and 100% NiO, nickel III is 90ish percent nio, nickel ii carbonate is around 64% nio

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got the molecular weight of nickel carb at 118.702 and the oxide at 74.693 so (after rounding) 74.7/118.7 = 0.63  So reverse that for subbing nickel carb for the oxide. It's my understanding that nickel oxide can be black or green dependent on the processing method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Brandon Franks said:

Okay so this is confusing the hell out of me because there are not that many articles about it.

 

All recipes I have call for black nickel oxide. I don't have it, I have green and black is hard to get around me.

 

However,

The density of black is higher than green, but the oxide weight is higher in the green. So, say a recipe calls for 4% black, if I do 4% green, it should be almost equal, right?

 

I had a straight conversion list for oxides, but it fell on my kiln and burned... karma for constantly rushing pots, I guess...

 

 

This may help as a resource in the future,
You can often go to Glazy.org, select materials and type in NIO for Nickel. From there often the various forms will show up. From that point if something needs to be converted  to an equivalent 100% form divide  the 100% recipe requirement by the concentration percentage of the carbonate  in this case gets the carbonate equivalent of the oxide. So 10 grams of the oxide would be equal to 10 / . 62930 or 15.89 g of the carbonate.

Sorry, math challenged tonight! Can also be 10X 1.62930 (add a one to the concentration, not the LOI for those who don’t want to divide)

785DF9DE-C215-432C-9B13-F4491001663F.jpeg.9b4c101ec2c72ef2e2159e491f1f31e4.jpeg
 

5CDE85A6-9513-456B-8885-C4E0D81F1CD2.jpeg.fd2ad54efec73c3fa66d03ff28640fef.jpeg

 

Edited by Bill Kielb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Bill Kielb said:

This may help as a resource in the future,
You can often go to Glazy.org, select materials and type in NIO for Nickel. From there often the various forms will show up. From that point if something needs to be converted  to an equivalent 100% form multiply the 100% recipe requirement by 1 plus the LOI or 1.3707 in this case gets the carbonate equivalent of the oxide. So 10 grams of the oxide would be equal to 10x1.3707 or 13.707 g of the carbonate.

785DF9DE-C215-432C-9B13-F4491001663F.jpeg.9b4c101ec2c72ef2e2159e491f1f31e4.jpeg

 

EE9CCDD7-FEF7-4E58-B0B4-8DBD3FE2DF31.jpeg

Thats super helpful, I am familiar with glazy but was unaware about this.

 

Thanks a lot,

Brandon 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Brandon Franks said:

Thats super helpful, I am familiar with glazy but was unaware about this.

 

Thanks a lot,

Brandon 

@Brandon Franks
Whoops, had to fix that! Use the corrected above. Post in a sec. Sorry forgot my math!

The Glazy resource is handy so at least that’s something that won’t fall into the kiln . (hopefully)

Edited by Bill Kielb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.