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From 4 cuft to 12 cuft, finally got a big boy kiln!


liambesaw
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2 hours ago, Denice said:

Your wife may never see you again because your  busy trying to fill the kiln  make sure you keep your date nights.    Congratulations        Denice

I don't work out there until the wife and kids are in bed ;). But you're right, might have to start abandoning them

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Well it made it through a cone 04 bisque on schedule!  18 hours, 13 minutes.  That's slow bisque to 04 (13 hours 26 minutes) plus a 4 hour preheat (100f/hr to 200 and hold for 4 hours).

Currently at 750, just waiting for it to cool down enough to unload and reload and I can get to the glaze firing test.   I've got witness cones scattered about so hopefully will be able to get a good idea on dead spots and tc offset.

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8 minutes ago, liambesaw said:

Well it made it through a cone 04 bisque on schedule!  18 hours, 13 minutes.  That's slow bisque to 04 (13 hours 26 minutes) plus a 4 hour preheat (100f/hr to 200 and hold for 4 hours).

Currently at 750, just waiting for it to cool down enough to unload and reload and I can get to the glaze firing test.   I've got witness cones scattered about so hopefully will be able to get a good idea on dead spots and tc offset.

  • Positive indicator of design power to shell losses plus new elements! Now the longer cool downs due to mass. Good thing it’s outside and winter. :D
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1 hour ago, liambesaw said:

Yeah so far so good!  After a bunch of people asking me if I'm sure about the amperage I was scared I was going to trip the breaker while firing!  I mean I'm not in the clear yet, but this was certainly a good sign.

Spot on at 48 amps so new breaker should be no issues.

At 12 kw for 12 cu ft. Maybe a bit light on power for its size  but lots of evenly spaced elements. And the top seal has to help a bunch. Looks like a nice kiln and worst case can always set it on top of some rigid insulation and decrease  your loses pretty easily and economically. Doubt you will have to adjust anything.

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1 minute ago, Bill Kielb said:

Should be no insulation, it would be visible with a step in the sheet metal at the top.

That's what I was thinking. I'm just wondering about the amperage draw. According to the  Crucible web page, the 12 cubic foot Model 25 should be on a 70 amp breaker, meaning it would draw more than 48 amps. That makes sense because at 48 amps 12 cubic feet wouldn't get to cone 8. 10 cubic foot kilns on 240V1P service get to cone 8. So I'm wondering if this kiln is a Model 20, which does pull 48 amps, which would be smaller than 12 cubic feet.

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14 minutes ago, neilestrick said:

That's what I was thinking. I'm just wondering about the amperage draw. According to the  Crucible web page, the 12 cubic foot Model 25 should be on a 70 amp breaker, meaning it would draw more than 48 amps. That makes sense because at 48 amps 12 cubic feet wouldn't get to cone 8. 10 cubic foot kilns on 240V1P service get to cone 8. So I'm wondering if this kiln is a Model 20, which does pull 48 amps, which would be smaller than 12 cubic feet.

This is an older model I think, here is the name plate.  The person I bought it from had it on a 60 amp breaker as well:

 

00F0F_FYLG2U8UJ3_1200x900.jpg

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28 minutes ago, neilestrick said:

That's what I was thinking. I'm just wondering about the amperage draw. According to the  Crucible web page, the 12 cubic foot Model 25 should be on a 70 amp breaker, meaning it would draw more than 48 amps. That makes sense because at 48 amps 12 cubic feet wouldn't get to cone 8. 10 cubic foot kilns on 240V1P service get to cone 8. So I'm wondering if this kiln is a Model 20, which does pull 48 amps, which would be smaller than 12 cubic feet.

I think this kiln has a huge amount of radiation surface. Liam sent me a picture and it really looks very good comparatively. Although this is just speculation from a picture. I think he may have a gem.

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Well, it didn't trip the breaker, but it did take 9 hours to fire a relatively light load of some big pots.  Looks like it's more of a cone 8 kiln after all?

I think the Bartlett firing schedule is 8 hours to cone 6, so an hour behind.  It's still at 450 degrees, but I took a peek at the witness cones and they look spot on for a cone 6 so no overfiring.

A little disappointed, but glad it works

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2 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Well, it didn't trip the breaker, but it did take 9 hours to fire a relatively light load of some big pots.  Looks like it's more of a cone 8 kiln after all?

I think the Bartlett firing schedule is 8 hours to cone 6, so an hour behind.  It's still at 450 degrees, but I took a peek at the witness cones and they look spot on for a cone 6 so no overfiring.

A little disappointed, but glad it works

With the amount of work that kiln holds, you won't be firing it nearly as often as a smaller kiln, so even if you get fewer firings than planned you'll still come out ahead. And it will give you the opportunity to make some bigger pots than before!

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Hey congrads! As everyone has said, great deal. We've got the model 20 (I think its 9.3 cf). We bought it for just under 2 grand in 2008 with the Bartlett controller and it has been solid as can be. I've moved it 3 times now and one of those moves was from Seattle down to Dallas and then from Dallas to the Austin area and it held up fine.

Snapped a pic of the back below to show the hinge assembly ours has. I know yours is the 25 and bigger but so far no issues with the top bricks on ours in over a dozen years now. It divides time with a Skutt 1027 but we have gotten well past 200 firings on a set of elements. We use it more than the Skutt because the oval shelves just load better for things other than mugs.   

 

ovalkiln.jpg

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4 minutes ago, neilestrick said:

With the amount of work that kiln holds, you won't be firing it nearly as often as a smaller kiln, so even if you get fewer firings than planned you'll still come out ahead. And it will give you the opportunity to make some bigger pots than before!

Yep, got my big monkey jug in there right now.  Can't wait to get home and see how it turned out.  

 

bla.jpg

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1 minute ago, Stephen said:

Hey congrads! As everyone has said, great deal. We've got the model 20 (I think its 9.3 cf). We bought it for just under 2 grand in 2008 with the Bartlett controller and it has been solid as can be. I've moved it 3 times now and one of those moves was from Seattle down to Dallas and then from Dallas to the Austin area and it held up fine.

Snapped a pic of the back below to show the hinge assembly ours has. I know yours is the 25 and bigger but so far no issues with the top bricks on ours in over a dozen years now. It divides time with a Skutt 1027 but we have gotten well past 200 firings on a set of elements. We use it more than the Skutt because the oval shelves just load better for things other than mugs.   

 

ovalkiln.jpg

Wow nice!  I've had the crucible 234 and it worked great but was just so small (18x23).  Hopefully this one holds up for many years as well.  I have the same hinge system as that.  Luckily I live 30 minutes from the manufacturer so I can always go yell at them if I need to

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