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25 minutes ago, neilestrick said:

Why do you assume they haven't researched this already? They've been making and selling kilns for over 50 years, and are well aware of safety issues and liabilities.

Well, I have researched the assemblies, L&L folks are not code experts or fire rated assembly experts so they  probably do not want to over promote or assume that liability. There is a perception of this product that could lead to using it to cover a cavity in lieu of rated materials.. Since it conducts heat rather well it can elevate the risk of fire by allowing the cavity to heat faster. It’s design intent and assembly rating are as the manufacture states not necessarily the answer to kiln issues. Fireproof is not the same as fire resistant.

I actually did not realize these issues with cement board until I went to design something that mattered and had to really comply. I guess my question would be why wouldn’t one inform them. If they like the elevated risk then they can leave what they have written. Informing them seems to be the right thing to do.

Edited by Bill Kielb

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1 hour ago, Bill Kielb said:

Well, I have researched the assemblies, L&L folks are not code experts or fire rated assembly experts so they  probably do not want to over promote or assume that liability. There is a perception of this product that could lead to using it to cover a cavity in lieu of rated materials.. Since it conducts heat rather well it can elevate the risk of fire by allowing the cavity to heat faster. It’s design intent and assembly rating are as the manufacture states not necessarily the answer to kiln issues. Fireproof is not the same as fire resistant.

I actually did not realize these issues with cement board until I went to design something that mattered and had to really comply. I guess my question would be why wouldn’t one inform them. If they like the elevated risk then they can leave what they have written. Informing them seems to be the right thing to do.

This is my last statement, as this thread has drifted enough.

Again, you're making assumptions about what they do or do not know.  You're assuming that every use of the board is to build a fire rated wall. That would fall under local building codes, which they have already mentioned should be followed. There is no code that says the wall around the kiln must be fireproof, you just need minimum clearances. I think you're equating your experience at the community center with all uses of cement board around kilns.

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1 hour ago, neilestrick said:

This is my last statement, as this thread has drifted enough.

Again, you're making assumptions about what they do or do not know.  You're assuming that every use of the board is to build a fire rated wall. That would fall under local building codes, which they have already mentioned should be followed. There is no code that says the wall around the kiln must be fireproof, you just need minimum clearances. I think you're equating your experience at the community center with all uses of cement board around kilns.

Yeah,

My last comment as well. Bottom line there is no harm in informing them they might want to review their verbiage. Assuming they know all risks and not informing them seems to be the least correct thing to do in my view. Informing them provides an opportunity for them to evaluate and correct if need be.

I see many posts here overtime that have the same, let’s say, potentially incorrect perception of cement board (including my own btw with regard to ceiling protection) I am not sure of the origination but I take it as something  I should  be more cautious in suggesting and they may want to as well. We obviously differ in opinion.

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I have my kilns (9c.f. & 7cf) 20 inches from the drywall covered wall and the walls are cool to the touch when either kiln is at cone 6. Skutt advises 18 inches. I wonder if this thread confuses when doing more is nessesary. Overkill certainly isn't a bad thing but taking it too far I worry will scare folks off of even having a kiln in a home studio.

Edited by Stephen

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My kiln was next to a dry wooden redwood wall with a bunch of 1/4 inch glass and assorted metal sings for 40 plus years without a hint of toasted wood.It was about 8 inches from all with the rest of stuff behind it. The tile backer board especially held off an inch or or 2 or 4 makes for no fire and a very safe surround .

The rest of the fire rated wall story is as I mentioned in my 1st post -for most garages attached to homes and that code is clear . Most put kilns in existing buildings where codes have already been meet so wrapping in tile backer just improves safety -adding to ceiling is also a good idea..Really this thing is all about common sense. I have only heard of one fire from an electric and they placed it a few inches from a plywood wall. The wood was smoking hot and caused the smoke detector to go off in a basement. That was all the fault of the owners. They got to it before flames started.-Again common sense. Kiln instructions give enough info for 99% of consumers to figure it out. 

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My kiln is outdoors and will get a leaf blown on top of it once in a while.  They've never caught on fire though.  It's great to be extra cautious, but I think the 10-12 inches or whatever your manufacturer recommends is likely plenty.

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