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Hey everybody! Brand new member but seasoned artist (to an extent). I have a very specific thought/question in mind that I cannot for the life of me find the answer to on google. I'm wanting to use some sort of high silica and/or high flux glaze to intentionally pool INSIDE the bottom of a bowl to make a sort of clear water effect. Would Shaner clear do just fine? or should I alter the recipe of some other clear glaze? Mix a whole new one? How thick can I make the glaze before it doesn't come out right? For best results should I pour it in layers or all at once? I fire at ^10 so high fire glazes is what I'm talking about. I've seen it done with crystallines but never just a standard low craze clear. Let me know what you got!

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If the Shaner clear doesn't pool enough for you when thick then take out some of the epk from the recipe. The more you take out the more likely it is to craze though. 

edit: If the glaze is "too thick" and the pot is "too thin" then you can run into problems with the glaze layer cracking or even pulling the pot apart where the base meets the wall. How much is too thick and too thin is going to vary but I wouldn't make potato chip thin pots to pool glaze in.

@Stone Fig, thank you for giving us an idea of your experience, it's helpful!

Edited by Min
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11 hours ago, Stone Fig said:

Hey everybody! Brand new member but seasoned artist (to an extent). I have a very specific thought/question in mind that I cannot for the life of me find the answer to on google. I'm wanting to use some sort of high silica and/or high flux glaze to intentionally pool INSIDE the bottom of a bowl to make a sort of clear water effect. Would Shaner clear do just fine? or should I alter the recipe of some other clear glaze? Mix a whole new one? How thick can I make the glaze before it doesn't come out right? For best results should I pour it in layers or all at once? I fire at ^10 so high fire glazes is what I'm talking about. I've seen it done with crystallines but never just a standard low craze clear. Let me know what you got!

Everyone has great input here, just to add, you mention low crazing glaze but glazes craze  primarily due to the mismatch in expansion rates of the glaze and claybody so there is not really such a thing as a specific low crazing glaze. Thick applications of glaze often magnify this mismatch as well and they tend to craze more so. Thick applications of glaze also tends to magnify the effect of crawling as well, often as a result of application, drying of application, and a glazes fired surface tension. Thick applications of clear glaze often appear hazy or milky as well.

So the point being, you will likely need to test with your clay and  glaze and work out any issues you find outside of your esthetic desire.

Edited by Bill Kielb
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If you use a very glossy glaze it will give you that watery look, and appear to have a lot of depth without actually having to make the glaze super thick. Tinting it with some color, like a blue or green, will help to accentuate the depth. If your glaze fits well on your clay body, you can apply it fairly thick without it crazing.

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I think the color tinmting would help you make it like water.

Often I think of these as broken windsheid glazes that craze like crazy are completly non-functional but they do look interesting .

Edited by Mark C.
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4 hours ago, JohnnyK said:

Have you thought about using actual glass for the effect? It would take some experimentation but the results could be pretty real looking. Here is a sculpture with glass incorporated...

2139169910_Sculpturewithglass.jpg.5b2059d3de20373a1b2033eccac2be43.jpg

I hadn't thought about using real glass at all actually; this is a gorgeous piece! i live near the coast so I might try to find some sea glass shards and see what the minerals do in the kiln. Thank you so much for this input!

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@Stone Fig, glass does look gorgeous when fired on clay but there are definite safety concerns with this practice. You mentioned you were looking for a glaze to fire on the inside of a bowl, I'ld really reconsider firing glass on a functional piece. There is a very strong likelihood of getting glaze slivers coming off the melted glass, might not happen straight away but it's a distinct possibility that it will happen sooner or later. This subject has come up several times on the forum, can do a search for other opinions on it, one link below that I started that discusses it.

 

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@Min Apologies! I didn't mean I would be using it on this piece. 90% of what I do is purely decorative, and I'm always looking for more ideas on surface treatment. Totally different thoughts

edit: just looked through that thread you shared. it sounds like fun but that was a short lived excitement! i'd rather stick to my powdered frit

Edited by Stone Fig
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2 hours ago, Stone Fig said:

@Min Apologies! I didn't mean I would be using it on this piece. 90% of what I do is purely decorative, and I'm always looking for more ideas on surface treatment. Totally different thoughts

edit: just looked through that thread you shared. it sounds like fun but that was a short lived excitement! i'd rather stick to my powdered frit

I think sometimes we forget or ignore that our intentions on function mean very little to the person who buys or receives what we make.   That means that maybe in our heads our bowl is decorative and not meant for food, but that as soon as it leaves our hands, we have no control over what someone may do with it.  But you are still responsible for the consequences when someone injures themselves with your decorative piece.  

So it's best to not mix functional forms with potentially dangerous art (lead, cadmium, vanadium, glass, etc), because although you may sell it as non-functional, that disclaimer may not follow that piece around.

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min, just came across the thread you started on the 11th of January, 2019.    excellent!   it is wonderful that this group can have an actual discussion about subjects that could cause friction but result in understanding, not antagonism.

(i think it funny that the original question was the first by a member who asked it on January 9 and who has not been heard of since.)

 

 

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