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Brandon Franks

Storing Crystalline Glazes

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Hey,

 

I heard somewhere that storing Crystalline glazes won't give the same result every time, but what is the real effect of having glazes sit around. Obviously, over time, as all glazes are, the color will change, but if I am keeping them for 1-3 months at a time, will is see any huge differences?

 

If I start storing them, I would do 3500gram batches.

 

I am sick of spending 3 hours glazing for 10 pots, and am really tempted to begin storing the glazes and just dip glaze them. 

 

Any tips?

Thanks,

Brandon

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1 hour ago, Brandon Franks said:

Obviously, over time, as all glazes are, the color will change, but if I am keeping them for 1-3 months at a time, will is see any huge differences?

Why would the color change? The only time you should see a difference in glazes over time is if there are materials that are slightly soluble, and the salts are coming out into the water and/or crystallizing on the sides of the bucket to such a degree that it's altering the chemistry of the glaze. But it should take a really long time for that to happen. I have many glazes in my studio that slowly get used over the period of a year or more, with no changes.

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On 12/23/2019 at 3:20 PM, neilestrick said:

Why would the color change? The only time you should see a difference in glazes over time is if there are materials that are slightly soluble, and the salts are coming out into the water and/or crystallizing on the sides of the bucket to such a degree that it's altering the chemistry of the glaze. But it should take a really long time for that to happen. I have many glazes in my studio that slowly get used over the period of a year or more, with no changes.

I have read it in a few books about the color changes - Never heard any explanation for it, but I always thought it didn't seem like it could happen. 

 

The glazes that you store for a while- if you get chunks of hardened glaze at the bottom, how do you get at them? In the studio I teach at, the students go at it with the drill, I, fortunately, have never had the problem, but I assume crystal will increase that likelihood.

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20 hours ago, Mark C. said:

A thrift shop blender will make any glaze smooth as silk

If you are looking at thrift shop blenders, don't get a Waring, only Hamilton Beach or Oster. The threads on the bottom of the blender pitcher (where it screws onto the blade base) are the same as a standard mason canning jar. Mix your glaze in the mason jar, put the blade thingy on the jar, flip it onto the blender, and hit puree. Store your glazes in the mason jar and reblend whenever needed. Nothing wrong with Waring blenders as blenders, but the thread on the pitcher is different, can't use mason canning jars.

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