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Hi everyone! I'm trying to find out what combination of Lustre glazes this person used in order to try an recreate it on a vase. This person won't give out their recipe and I totally understand why but it's for my own curiosity and not to sell any products. What are your thoughts on this combination? https://www.instagram.com/p/B5ANbf6AU_4/?igshid=vbzq2wap6n2u

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23 minutes ago, neilestrick said:

I'm not sure I would drink out of that...

I might, as long as I knew what metal was used.

After all, once fired, a resin lustre is just a metallic film.  What I wouldn't like, is the taste!  Gross metal taste in your coffee, no thanks!

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I have seen that purple before in crystalline glaze. Titanium reacts with iron\ zinc when fired in reduction to produce purple. I have gotten purple in oxidation using prescribed levels of iron and titanium. I would start an experimental recipe with 8% titanium, 3% iron, and 4-5% zinc: and reduce on the cooling cycle. I do not know the exact recipe, although by the run Nep SY is most likely the primary flux.

Tom

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47 minutes ago, glazenerd said:

I have seen that purple before in crystalline glaze. Titanium reacts with iron\ zinc when fired in reduction to produce purple. I have gotten purple in oxidation using prescribed levels of iron and titanium. I would start an experimental recipe with 8% titanium, 3% iron, and 4-5% zinc: and reduce on the cooling cycle. I do not know the exact recipe, although by the run Nep SY is most likely the primary flux.

Tom

That's an interesting idea, but I do think it's lustre since most of her other work has lustre as well.  Either way it looks pretty cool!

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6 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Looks like mother of pearl or red lustre on a black glaze.  Lustres come in every color of the rainbow (even rainbow)

I was thinking that but as discussed by neilestrick I wouldn't really see that as food safe. I'd pretty much limit it to vases but good thought!!

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15 minutes ago, Squeakin000 said:

I was thinking that but as discussed by neilestrick I wouldn't really see that as food safe. I'd pretty much limit it to vases but good thought!!

Just so we are clear, most lustre overglazes are dinnerware safe, as they are simply metal films after being fired.

Here is the Duncan information page: http://www.overglazes.com/duncan.html where it clearly states all of its overglazes are dinnerware safe.  They have no caveat or asterisk there.

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This persons’ work keeps coming across my desktop for some reason. I believe she is known to work with commercial glazes, so I have to second Liam’s idea about this being a reddish glaze with a layer of mother of pearl. @glazenerdThe texture isn’t a glaze run: this artist does a lot of heavily applied slip underneath the glaze.

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7 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Just so we are clear, most lustre overglazes are dinnerware safe, as they are simply metal films after being fired.

Here is the Duncan information page: http://www.overglazes.com/duncan.html where it clearly states all of its overglazes are dinnerware safe.  They have no caveat or asterisk there.

 

7 hours ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

This persons’ work keeps coming across my desktop for some reason. I believe she is known to work with commercial glazes, so I have to second Liam’s idea about this being a reddish glaze with a layer of mother of pearl. @glazenerdThe texture isn’t a glaze run: this artist does a lot of heavily applied slip underneath the glaze.

Ok that makes sense, looking at the photo again I can see a tiny little section where the color is painted under the drip on top of the black glaze underneath. Thank you!

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From a photographic standpoint I would guess that it is not a luster at all but some color whose reflection is picking up and combining with a blue sky to give the sensation of a purple luster. I think that if it was truly a luster, you would see more of it in different parts of the shiny black...

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From scrolling through Emma thesilverspot (potter who's mug is in first post) instagram it looks like she fires electric, uses sloppy slip and commercial brush on glazes. She mentions using up to 6 layers of glaze and a third firing so to me it does sound like an applied luster over runny glazes (there are images of other pots without the luster that have very fluid glazes). 

@Squeakin000, if you do use lusters really follow the safety precautions while using them, they are incredibly nasty to work with. Wear the appropriate respirator, work outdoors etc.

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If you go through the rest of her feed, she uses a fair bit of mother of pearl in the rest of her work, so I think it’s a reasonable assumption. Mother of pearl can be very difficult to photograph accurately with a phone, and optimal light conditions are needed. While I do know of some accounts that use a dslr to take their Instagram photos, it adds steps and isn’t typical.

Or we could all do something whacky and ask her, rather than guess about it amongst ourselves. I messaged her on Instagram to see if she’d be willing to clarify about the optical effect. 

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21 minutes ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

If you go through the rest of her feed, she uses a fair bit of mother of pearl in the rest of her work, so I think it’s a reasonable assumption. Mother of pearl can be very difficult to photograph accurately with a phone, and optimal light conditions are needed. While I do know of some accounts that use a dslr to take their Instagram photos, it adds steps and isn’t typical.

Or we could all do something whacky and ask her, rather than guess about it amongst ourselves. I messaged her on Instagram to see if she’d be willing to clarify about the optical effect. 

@Squeakin000 messaged her already, she didn't want to share 

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Just going to add that although Duncan overglazes are labelled as dinnerware safe we can't conclude that all lusters are. From Walker Ceramics and their luster information sheet "HEALTH & SAFETY NOTES These colours contain lead, cadmium and other metals which may be hazardous to health if swallowed." If there is lead and cadmium in them before firing then it's going to be there after firing. 

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Just now, Min said:

Just going to add that although Duncan overglazes are labelled as dinnerware safe we can't conclude that all lusters are. From Walker Ceramics and their luster information sheet "HEALTH & SAFETY NOTES These colours contain lead, cadmium and other metals which may be hazardous to health if swallowed." If there is lead and cadmium in them before firing then it's going to be there after firing. 

Agreed! That's why I said id drink out of it as long as I knew what metal was used.  There are old school colored lustres and some that use lead instead of bismuth as the flux.  Important to read the documentation of what you're using.  Duncan's lustres are the only ones I've seen that have a dinnerware safe designation. (Gold, bright gold, platinum, titanium [mother of pearl])

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