Jump to content
Anax

Bisquing and glazing a bottomless item

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

New here and first post. I am also very new to working with clay but have been really enjoying it and ready to learn more.

I have constructed a clay Udu drum, it's like a vase with a curved bottom and a hole in the side. I haven't bisqued it yet and am looking for advice how I might glaze after bisquing so that I can achieve full coverage.

I have attached a photo for you. Please let me know what other information I can provide to help getting a better answer.

Would tripod stilts be sufficient?

Looking forward to participating in this forum!

IMG_20190621_150933_726.jpg.2990cd0fec6c07e9b07746fd5267a6bd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about for simplicity a typical foot ring and that can be the only unglazed surface? So inside, out and bottom normal glaze and just wipe clean the foot ring? Makes for easy placement in the kiln. Make sure the bottom does not touch the kiln shelf though.

Edited by Bill Kielb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bill,

Thanks for the suggestion.  I also considered this but decided against it for several reasons including a. aesthetics, b. acoustics and c. player comfort.

Essentially I'm looking for tips that deal with the drum as shown and described. I will keep your advice in mind for future iterations.

Edited by Anax

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, the drums I have seen all have bottoms are hand made and often pit fired. If yours is bottomless can you just wipe the glaze from the bottom edge? Maybe I am just unclear what the glaze issue is. If you have a bottom but no foot then maybe don’t glaze, finish the bottom later with urethane or acrylic ......

Just some thoughts

Edited by Bill Kielb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's take it from a different angle, Bill. This drum is bottomless. I want to know if there is a way to glaze the entire surface, there is no such bottom edge to wipe glaze away from. I want 100% coverage.

Think of a ball with a neck opening and a hole in it's side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Anax said:

Let's take it from a different angle, Bill. This drum is bottomless. I want to know if there is a way to glaze the entire surface, there is no such bottom edge to wipe glaze away from. I want 100% coverage.

Think of a ball with a neck opening and a hole in it's side.

Thanks,  you might want to post a picture of the underside of this. I was going to suggest you can fire it upside down but again if you do not want to touch up anything and 100% is truly 100% then some sort of stilt will get you close. I think a picture would help others formulate ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Anax said:

Let's take it from a different angle, Bill. This drum is bottomless. I want to know if there is a way to glaze the entire surface, there is no such bottom edge to wipe glaze away from. I want 100% coverage.

Think of a ball with a neck opening and a hole in it's side.

If it's a low fire item you can stilt it, but if it's mid or high fire there's not a good option for 100% glazing coverage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's lowfire you could suspend it upside down with a tall kiln post inside. Outside could be completely glazed, inside glazed down to where the kiln post would be in contact with the inside of the base. If the unglazed interior area where the kiln post rests effects the acoustics then perhaps a cold finish sealer over that area would resolve the issue. Might be able to get away with this with midfire, would depend on the claybody.

edit: the title says bottomless but in your description you say "it's ball with a neck opening and a hole in it's side" so would footless describe it?

Edited by Min

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you mean it's rounded on the bottom, rather than flat? If so, then it has a bottom, it just doesn't have a foot. Not having a bottom would mean that's it's open at the bottom, like at the top. That's a different issue. How to glaze fire your drum will depend on what cone you plan to glaze fire to. What clay body did you use, and how hot do you plan to glaze fire? How tall is the piece? If it were mine, I'd fire it upside down and leave the lip unglazed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/14/2019 at 10:02 AM, Min said:

If it's lowfire you could suspend it upside down with a tall kiln post inside. Outside could be completely glazed, inside glazed down to where the kiln post would be in contact with the inside of the base. If the unglazed interior area where the kiln post rests effects the acoustics then perhaps a cold finish sealer over that area would resolve the issue. Might be able to get away with this with midfire, would depend on the claybody.

edit: the title says bottomless but in your description you say "it's ball with a neck opening and a hole in it's side" so would footless describe it?

I use this method to fire pots upside down.  Some of my planters are shaped like a trumpet bell.  They would take up a lot of room if they were all fired rim to rim.  By firing some upside down, they stack closely together.  I use a soft brick biscuit cut to 1/4" or so thick, round and close to the size of the bottom on an appropriate kiln post.  This is secure enough for a cone 10 firing.  Get some interesting drips running up to the rim rather than down to the foot.

In the case of the drum, I'd leave an unglazed ring at the inside of the neck and then size a biscuit to fit that space.  Sometimes they stick a little, but can be knocked free with no damage.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.