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Higby raku glaze temps

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I'm experimenting with Wayne Higby's Raku glazes....Higby Canyon Orange, Higby Water Blue, Higby Green, and have not yet hit the "sweetspot" for glaze maturation. They seem tricky and have tried different thicknesses and temps, with minimal success. Been trying in the 1800-1900 degree range. Anybody out there using these glazes with success and can direct me to what temp you're firing them at?

Thanks,  Mike Brown,  LizardHill Pottery

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1 hour ago, LizardHill said:

I'm experimenting with Wayne Higby's Raku glazes....Higby Canyon Orange, Higby Water Blue, Higby Green, and have not yet hit the "sweetspot" for glaze maturation. They seem tricky and have tried different thicknesses and temps, with minimal success. Been trying in the 1800-1900 degree range. Anybody out there using these glazes with success and can direct me to what temp you're firing them at?

Thanks,  Mike Brown,  LizardHill Pottery

Someone may have great experience, so this is just a thought. W e bought a cheap green dot laser pointer and I started using it to observe just how melted the glazes were as we were firing. It led to some pretty interesting conclusions on when most of the wares were fully melted (All in the 1800 degree range but time at temperature now became important) and ready to remove. As a result of watching these firings, we also concluded that we should encourage thinner application of glaze on the interior of the pots to get similar melt between inside and outside. The laser also tended to calm us down on the temperature rise in favor of more even heating till full uniform melt. This may interest you and give you some ideas in your experimentation.

An interesting note, full melt was obvious as once melted the beam reflected easily over the melted glass surface. Hard to get a decent picture though, but the attached below gives a decent idea. Best $20.00 item I ever bought on Amazon. 

2019-11-12.png

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Whenever I've done raku, I've always just watched the glazes melt to determine when they were ready to pull. Once they go glassy they're usually good to go. After the first couple of loads and the kiln is heated up you can then switch over to a pyrometer for consistency. I've also noticed that not all glazes are ready to go at the same time. Some need longer. You could, of course adjust the glazes to get them to melt at the same time.

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Thanks Bill and Neil! Very interesting usage of your green dot laser pointer. Especially recognition that the inside of your pots need a thinner application to achieve an even melt. I've been using cones and a pyrometer in my firings  because the copper matte and some other glazes don't seem to achieve much glassy glow when firing. This is true of the Higby canyon orange glaze too. I'm using all three Higby glazes in my piece, much as Higby has done, and he must have had them all mature around the same temp. Since the Higby water blue glaze has more gloss, think I'll use it as my "witness' glaze, and pull when that glaze is shining.

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On 11/12/2019 at 7:34 PM, neilestrick said:

I wouldn't mess with cones. Raku firings are generally too quick for them to be accurate.

Not that I would suggest using them  but cones should begin to bend, they are made of glaze.

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