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Hi, I'm new to making coloured slips. I have Mason stains, and am using white stoneware clay and also white earthenware clay.  I'm adding the Mason stain to a white slip and then sgraffito-ing it before bisque firing. I then use a transparent glaze. So far I've not been able to replicate the colour on the Mason stain tub. The first slip recipe I used was 75% ball clay, 25% china clay. The second was 35% ball clay, 30% china clay, 15% silica quartz and 20% feldspar potash. Neither worked very well. Please could anyone advise what the best ingredients for the white slip are, so that I can get a true colour when fired? Thanks!

Edited by Amy-Lou

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Whatever you're putting the stain in can affect the color of the stain. That's true for clay or glazes. The percentage of stain will also affect the color. You'll want to test it from about 3% up to 20%, depending on how strong you want the color. How hot you fire and in what atmosphere will also affect the color. Many stains will color shift above low fire temps. Your clear glaze can also affect the color. For the best results as far as having the slip fit the clay body, you should make the slip out of your clay body.

1. How hot are your firing?

2. Oxidation or reduction?

3. What percentage stain are you using?

4. What glaze are you using?

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(For the best results as far as having the slip fit the clay body, you should make the slip out of your clay body.)

yes this is best if you want whiter use a porcelain clay that shrinks the same as your clay body (same  or close shrinkage rate) and make that clay into a slip.

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As Liam says,  follow the reference codes on the mason Stain http://www.masoncolor.com/reference-guide.

You need to use a slip base that accommodates which ever stain you are using AND use a glaze that will enhance the color. Mason stains are expensive. You need to use them according to Mason's guidelines. One size does NOT fit all. Val Cushing base for low temperature underglaze use was

Frit 3134  33%, EPK 33%, silica 33%  then add stain 10-25% depending on the intensity of the stain and the hue you want.  This is for low fire 06-04.  You could possible re-formulate for what ever temperature you are looking for.

 

Marcia

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Hi, thanks everyone.

In answer to your questions:

1. Firing to 1240

2. Oxidation in electric kiln

3. G72150 multi-purpose stoneware transparent glaze, firing range 1200 - 1290

4a. I first used Mason Peacock 6266 at 8% (with the china clay/ ball clay slip - oh, also with a little feldspar potash, recommended by the supplier)

This resulted in a very dark blue - could I rectify this by just diluting it with more of the ball/china/little bit of potash clay slip?

  4b.   Then I used Mason Deep Turquoise 6315 at 8% (with the more complicated slip)

I was advised to add the feldspar potash and the silica by the supplier that I bought the stains from, but it resulted in a very washed out anaemic blue instead of the deep turquoise.

I imagine I should just forget about the complicated slip?

Am I still ok using the ball clay/china clay/little bit of potash  slip with the stoneware (I have mixed up quite a bit)?

Would there be any difference between using this and a slip made from the white stoneware clay?

I'm after a pure colour, as shown on the Mason stains chart.

Thanks again!

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(Would there be any difference between using this and a slip made from the white stoneware clay?)

slip made from the same clay you are using fits the body perfectly and will always be the best and cuase the least issues.

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2 hours ago, Cline Campbell Pottery said:

Neil, 

Could you please tell us about the yellows you used on your striped mug?

Cynthia

I do all my decorating with commercial underglazes. They're much simpler to deal with than colored slips, and I can touch up areas on bisque if needed. The mug in my avatar is Speedball Yellow-Orange, but the glaze over it is a cream/beige color so it tones it down a bit. The yellow I use is Speedball Yellow mixed with a bit of Yellow-Orange in a 6:1 ratio. The yellow is way too bright otherwise. The yellow-orange addition turns it a little more golden. I always use the cream glaze over the yellow, too. When I mix underglazes, I do it by weight, because it's difficult to measure them out by volume since they stick to the container.

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amy-lou,  way back in 1972 i thought deep turquoise was a beautiful color and i bought 5 pounds of it.    i am down to about a pound now and in all that time i have never NEVER gotten any color that was acceptable to me.   in any recipe for anything.   i am on glaze test 525 or so.

maybe you can find another color that you love.

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