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PeppernPatches

What is fair market compensation for teaching pottery workshops?

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I know there is no set formula for what to pay teachers for teaching pottery workshops, and have heard a wide variety of answers, which only seem to confuse the issue more. The standard, and most simplest compensation format, seems to be 50% of the total workshop fees collected (with min and max enrollment). I've had organizations offer an hourly scale based on experience, from $20 hrly to $50 hrly for only the workshop hours taught,  which I feel is problematic and doesn't take into account other important artist costs (prep time, self-employment tax, travel time). The hourly scale also puts most of the profits into the organization, and can feel demoralizing for the artist. Does anyone have any opinions or thoughts on this?

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The price paid to a potter for workshops can vary greatly. A lot depends on how 'famous' the potter is. It also depends on  how the workshop is being organized. Assuming people are paying a fee to attend, then splitting the fees makes sense. But a lot places, especially schools, offer workshops that are free to the public as a way of bringing people into the studio. In those cases the artist and studio have to come to an agreement on a fair price. That may be hourly, or it may be a flat fee per day regardless of hours. There may be travel and housing costs included, too.

If I'm giving a short 2-3 hour workshop that's somewhere in the local Chicagoland area, I charge $75 per hour, because that's what I charge for kiln repair work, teacher trainings, etc. If I'm doing a full day workshop I usually charge $50 per hour, and expect lunch to be paid for. I also expect to be able to take some pots with me to sell to the attendees.

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If you’re splitting fees, it really is class dependant.

For the more formal, flat rate instances, CARFAC is a Canadian organization that advocates for all visual artists. They set out some reasonably useful recommended fee schedules for all kinds of art related activities. They actually correlate closely with Neil’s quoted numbers. In this instance, I wouldn’t worry about currency conversion and just take the numbers dollar for dollar.

CARFAC states that these fee schedules should be a minimum guideline, and does encourage artists to ask for more, based on experience. 

https://0655288595.saas.quicksilk.com/en/fee_schedule_2019_professional

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Thank you Callie and Neil! I think for the US, what Neil is saying makes sense, although it seems like some non-profits are paying far less. I find that the percentage formula gives the artist more incentive to help fill the class. However, some studios will start with a flat day rate, with a minimum enrollment, and then add $50 to the rate with each additional student past a certain number. So if the minimum enrollment is 6 people and maximum is 15, then after 10 people enroll, each additional student helps the organization pay more money to the instructor. In this country the strain is being felt in art organizations, and budgets are getting tighter.  It can be confusing for the self-employed potter sometimes, so I appreciate your  input!

Edited by PeppernPatches

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