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Skutt 1027 Touchscreen Cooling down program


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I am not familiar with exactly what Skutt might have done to change the standard Bartlett Genesis programming in their version of it, but the stock Genesis has a checkbox to turn "Slow cool" on or off at the end of a standard cone fire. When enabled, it does a 9999 drop to 1900F and then 150F/hr to 1500F. This may not be exactly what is in M^6G, but it is close enough. Check if your Skutt device has that same checkbox.

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Welcome to the forum. It looks pretty straightforward to put your own (or Mastering Cone 6 Glazes) schedule in. There is a video from Skutt here of how to do it. There is also a video of how to do a pre-programmed bisque or glaze firing but there doesn't appear to be a slow cool option for the pre-programmed firing, easy enough to do if you enter your program. One thing I would recommend is to double check you have entered everything correctly before firing. 

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  • 1 year later...

A much belated update to my earlier comment about the comparison between the Bartlett Genesis and Skutt adaptation of the Bartlett controller in their KMT (KilnMaster Touchscreen) controller as to cool down programming. The regular old-school Skutt KM, L&L Dynatrol, and Bartlett V6-CF controllers all had a means to append a cool-down segment to a basic cone-fire selection. The Dynatrol and native Bartlett controllers allow linking a full custom User 6 program to the end of a cone fire, while the Skutt KM offers only an optional user-defined single segment of cooling accessed by a few additional clicks at the end of the basic cone/speed/hold selection.

The new Bartlett Genesis touchscreen has a predetermined (but generally useful) single ramp cooling segment that can be activated at the end of a cone fire program by simply toggling the option on or off in the setup menu. The new Skutt KMT controller has eliminated the option for controlled cooling after a basic cone fire sequence. If you want controlled cooling at all, you must develop a complete custom ramp-hold that starts from cold, has appropriate ramps and setpoints on the way up and adds whatever custom cooling you want at the end.

This is offered as FYI for those who might want to know...

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I have a KM-1027 touchscreen also and spent a considerable amount of time looking for the "cool down" menu item, like the non touchscreens have before realizing it no longer existed! I use the Cone 6 Slow Cool Schedule from the book Amazing Glaze by Gabriel Kline from Odyssey Clayworks. 

Segment 1: 100 degrees per hour up to 200 degrees. 

Segment 2: 450 degrees per hour to 1900 degrees.

Segment 3: 108 degrees per hour to 2196 degrees. 

Segment 4: 150 degrees per hour to 1700 degrees. 

It's very easy to program. I also really recommend this book. Tons of great recipes, firing schedules and creative ideas. Good luck!

 

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@Katie Piro yes, programming is easy once one understands the logic of the controller and the technical requirements of clay and glaze. I have several very complicated custom programs for my crystalline glazes. But for many hobby potters, the simplicity of the cone fire method means they don't have to know all the details, it just works. And the quick link to a slow cool in the old controller gave them easy access to one more very useful option, no matter what cone. Now, one must program the whole thing, and know how to change it (or establish another program number) if you want to go to a different cone or change your ending hold for whatever reason. IMO, this is not an improvement for the average hobby potter who went to art school, not engineering school.

and @Mark C., yes, one more of several reasons I too prefer L&L. But because people know I know kilns, they ask me which to buy or how to use the one they bought. There are a lot of Skutts out there.

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9 hours ago, Dick White said:

@Katie Piro yes, programming is easy once one understands the logic of the controller and the technical requirements of clay and glaze. I have several very complicated custom programs for my crystalline glazes. But for many hobby potters, the simplicity of the cone fire method means they don't have to know all the details, it just works. And the quick link to a slow cool in the old controller gave them easy access to one more very useful option, no matter what cone. Now, one must program the whole thing, and know how to change it (or establish another program number) if you want to go to a different cone or change your ending hold for whatever reason. IMO, this is not an improvement for the average hobby potter who went to art school, not engineering school.

and @Mark C., yes, one more of several reasons I too prefer L&L. But because people know I know kilns, they ask me which to buy or how to use the one they bought. There are a lot of Skutts out there.

Yes there are -I have one.all Manual-justr perfect for an occasional bisque load .

Edited by Mark C.
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15 minutes ago, neilestrick said:

I don't know why Skutt insists on 'simplifying' their controllers. The KM is a dumbed down version of the V6-CF, so you lose the two bisque and two glaze options. The KMT is a version of the Genesis, but you lose certain optoins with it, too.

And worse, in my book, there is no written documentation of the complete operation of the KMT. There is what amounts to a quick start, and then all further information is supposedly available only through the on-screen help button, which is rather useless if one does not actually have one at hand. The Genesis has a reasonably full user manual available  - a printed copy included with the purchase or online if you haven't yet purchased it.

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