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TomDM

Where Does 3D Printing Fit?

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On 5/19/2019 at 4:53 AM, TomDM said:

This is interesting to me.  Are we talking about transferring COLOR to clay or being able to cut or form a shape into the clay?   If adding color imprints,  at what step might this best be done?

The answers could guide our upcoming advanced 3D immersion class exploration.  We like to give the students real-world lab exploration projects.   And, this sounds interesting.  Smooth-on has a variety of materials for creating molds and/or stamps,  I've not nee happy with creating stamps for printing on paper; but, our cadets might be fascinated with finding the best material for stamping color on ceramics surfaces.  Cool!

I'm talking about incising clay.  Ordinary rubber stamps work OK for putting colour on.

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I just had a name stamp made up from a 3-D printer. I chose a thin lined font but it just doesn't have a sharp enough edge to leave a crisp thin line on leatherhard pots. I've an older smaller stamp made by Jet Stamps which works terrifically, nice sharp edge even after stamping thousands of pots. If you could 3D print a stamp with a sharp edge that would be something I think there would be a market for.

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On 5/21/2019 at 11:34 AM, Min said:

I just had a name stamp made up from a 3-D printer. I chose a thin lined font but it just doesn't have a sharp enough edge to leave a crisp thin line on leatherhard pots. I've an older smaller stamp made by Jet Stamps which works terrifically, nice sharp edge even after stamping thousands of pots. If you could 3D print a stamp with a sharp edge that would be something I think there would be a market for.

This sounds like something very useful for our students on the autism-spectrum to tackle.  Perhaps we could work together to come up with what is required to make tools useful to clay artists.   Certainly stamps fall into this category.   Classes will be starting soon and I'd like to follow up on this.  Ultimately, our goal is to find a way to set up graduates on the autism-spectrum with a self-sustaining employment path using 3D printing.  This is the kind of project they could begin doing while still in school helping them to become familiar with the clay world.

http://www.youthquestfoundation.org/tag/vancouver-itech-preparatory/

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I'm a 3D modeler and I just started making some small stamps to use on my pottery. I'm still pretty new to everything, but I hope to utilize 3D printing more too. 

Stamps Image

I also think there is a place for 3D modeling/printing in the art world. It's not so "easy" as just pushing a button to print things. Modeling can take an incredible amount of time like any other art form. Printing takes long enough that no one would produce more than a small limited run of any one item. I haven't printed ceramics, but I think there's enough errors in printing and then glazing that it would be quite time consuming to get an exact copy. I have such a love for making that I will work in almost any medium, but there is something magical about the tactile feel of clay that makes it my favorite.

https://www.corinnehansen.com/

Edited by sorhain
adding more to say on the subject

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On 8/7/2019 at 1:58 PM, sorhain said:

I'm a 3D modeler and I just started making some small stamps to use on my pottery. I'm still pretty new to everything, but I hope to utilize 3D printing more too.

Wow Corinne.  Your work is wonderful! 

My daughter went to Moore College of Art in Philadelphia.    She is going to really appreciate what she sees when I send her a link to your site.

Polymaker makes a filament called PolySmooth that allows us to use alcohol vapors to smooth out the lines in an FDM print.  We have the PolySher which is the device that creates the alcohol vapors for smoothing.  It might be fun to see how well it works for stamps. 

Thank you for commenting.  :)  I loved it!

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20 hours ago, TomDM said:

Polymaker makes a filament called PolySmooth that allows us to use alcohol vapors to smooth out the lines in an FDM print.  We have the PolySher which is the device that creates the alcohol vapors for smoothing.  It might be fun to see how well it works for stamps. 

I will look into this filament as it sounds interesting to use. I'm not sure that the lines are a big issue for ceramics though. There is a certain amount of smoothing that occurs with glazing etc, but it would be interesting to try for sure. 

On 5/21/2019 at 11:34 AM, Min said:

I just had a name stamp made up from a 3-D printer. I chose a thin lined font but it just doesn't have a sharp enough edge to leave a crisp thin line on leatherhard pots. I've an older smaller stamp made by Jet Stamps which works terrifically, nice sharp edge even after stamping thousands of pots. If you could 3D print a stamp with a sharp edge that would be something I think there would be a market for.

My issue with stamps so far is more in my design. I did not make some of the forms as deep or crisp as I needed, so I'm still working on refining my 3D models before they get printed. I'm sure it can be done. I have to just tweak some settings in trial and error.

I would also love to see more of your daughter's work. I've visited Moore  College of Art. They had a great program that I highly considered, but I ended up going to Tyler School of Art instead.

Thank you for posting too!

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While Hammerly is more visible many universities are really working with this medium.  Most of their struggles are at the software state.  

This is still in fledgling state. I’ve played with it at my JC. While the printing is one thing, the real story is the software - creating that. There’s a lot of bugs to fix there.  Those working in fine tuning scanning is struggling too. 

Personally i welcome it. It’s just ceramics at another level. I guess the next big technological move since the discovery of the pottery wheel itself.  Like Math. No new concept after calculus until the modern game theory. Fascinating. 

Today if we are serious about using less plastic what option do we have? Ceramics?

Also some major art competitions don’t allow acrylics. How crazy is that. 

 

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