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Mark C.

Yellow Salt/Blue Salt

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This ones for Cactus pots who asked about a yellow glazetghis one works good in most applications -it can settle like a  rock so use some Magama to keep it afloat.

cone 10 reduction ,Salt/soda,wood

Dolomite----                 23.63%

Nepheline Syenite-  71.55%

OM 4 Ball clay.            4.82%

For yellow salt

add: Zircopax.             17.92%

Red iron OX.                  1.12%

Bentonite.                      4.50%

 

For Blue salt

Add:   Zircopac            17.92%

Cobalt Carbonate.       0.28 %

Red Iron OX.                    1.12%

Bentonite                         4.50%                

 

Edited by Mark C.

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Mark   Thanks for posting this.  I'm almost ready to start loading, so it's test tile time.  Does this glaze need salt/soda/wood to perform?    I'm just a straight reduction kind of guy.    I'll try it and see.  This is the yellow I have.     It's very nice, somewhat close to Heino but can't take reduction.   My kiln is all or nothing on reduction/oxidation.  So I don't use it.

 

Custer         33.1 

EPK             33.1

Dolomite   16.6

Whiting     6.6

Tin Ox     3.3

Bone Ash   5.3

RIO      0.7

Rutile   1.3

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Works well in reduction

I got this from teaching a workshop in Hi a few years back-they fired reduction cone 10 propane I use it with natural gas. Nice yellow -thickness will matter so sample test that as well.I use it on Porcelain but it can work on stoneware.Not many cone 10 folks around here to try it.

Edited by Mark C.

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If you take out the iron and add 1.1 rutile you get a nice white salt. There is also a green salt version with a couple percent of copper carb. It really does sink like a stone like Mark said, if you don't have magma add some epsom salt solution to the glaze.

The liner on this is yellow salt on ^10 b-mix (in soda).

IMG_2724.jpg.1560a6f8252081b33f941c8b36ecfebb.jpg

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Wow,      71%  Nepheline Syenite   No wonder the sinks like a stone warning.  I don't know the  magama or magma product.  Does it go by another name?  Source?

I knew I'd seen this glaze before,   It's in John Britt's glaze book.  I think I was scared off by the no clay content.  He shows it on porcelain and stoneware. 

Most glazes do look better on porcelain. 

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Full write up of what magma does here. Magma, (stands for "Miracle Anti-Gravity Multipurpose Additive"),  mostly burns off in the firing, need to add a tiny bit of copper to glazes containing magma or it rots. A little bit goes a long way, I have a tub of it mixed up with some copper carb and add a small dollop of it to glazes that hardpan. It works really well for suspending glazes, and they stay suspended for ages. I just used some yellow salt last week, hadn't used the glaze in over 6 months and it was still suspended, I find it works much better than bentonite or bentone ma (aka macaloid) for suspension but for me if I can use bentonite or macaloid instead I will as they are less expensive. With the yellow salt glaze you would have to add far more bentonite to the recipe that what it calls for to have the same suspending power as just a tiny bit of magma. The addition of double or even triple the bentonite would likely have an effect on the glaze whereas not with magma. Second best option would be to use the bentonite plus some epsom salt solution.

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There are many glaze supension agents out there.I have been talking about thos material for along time-but its a bit harder to source locally -online its around.Comes in two sizes

The key is the (Miracle Anti-Gravity )-this stuff can almost float stones.

I think space X is using it instead of rocket fuel next launch to clear earths gravity belt.

Ok that was a bit over the top.

The key is to as Min said add the small % of copper and also mix it in hot water to start. I have a small tub of the snot ready for a few settling glazes.This will cure them forever.

I still use epson salts in a glaze or two but thats all they need.

This stuff is powerful so use sparingly.

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14 hours ago, CactusPots said:

Does this glaze need salt/soda/wood to perform?   

I can't speak for the high nepheline syenite version but magnesia mattes with custer feldspar can react very well in soda atmospheres.

14 hours ago, CactusPots said:

Custer         33.1 

EPK             33.1

Dolomite   16.6

Whiting     6.6

Tin Ox     3.3

Bone Ash   5.3

RIO      0.7

Rutile   1.3 

I'm curious why this doesn't like reduction. It sort of looks like something I was testing a while ago although without bone ash, RIO and rutile. 

All I was after was a nice magnesia matte so was surprised with some lovely results from a soda kiln.

Your recipe has a bit more magnesia. I was using around 5% by weight but have versions that work with under 3% with more silica.

There are a couple of other differences of course but I'm curious. It looks like an interesting one to try in a soda kiln.

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What I wanted from this glaze was the light yellow of the famous Heino glaze.  Which I got several times in leaky natural gas up draft kilns, but not in my tight  propane  down draft.  It just burns a brown color for me.  My conclusion was that it's just an oxidation glaze.

As for the Magma only Big Ceramics and Bracker's list it at all, and both say out of stock.  Is it used in industry somewhere that I might track it down?  Nice of you guys to put me on the trail of unobtainium   :)

 

Edited by CactusPots
grammar

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29 minutes ago, CactusPots said:

What I wanted from this glaze was the light yellow of the famous Heino glaze.  Which I got several times in leaky natural gas up draft kilns, but not in my tight  propane  down draft.  It just burns a brown color for me.  My conclusion was that it's just an oxidation glaze.

gotcha'

If I remember right the I had closer to 0.5% iron but I was no where near Heino yellow - more yellow/beige.

 

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1 hour ago, CactusPots said:

Is it used in industry somewhere that I might track it down?  Nice of you guys to put me on the trail of unobtainium   :)

David Pier invented it, you could try contacting him and asking. (it isn't being restocked at Brackers or Big Ceramics Store?)

Edited by Min
clarity

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Can add it either way, if you add it to the dry materials then just weigh it out and mix it into the dry ingredients, add some copper carb as a preservative, amounts are in that link I posted above. I prefer to get the specific gravity set first then add a bit of magma goo / jelly to it then whiz it up with an immersion blender. If it settles just add a bit more. 

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Yes on what Min says-get the glaze the way you want it (thick or thin) then add a small amout of made up snot(magma)You will see whay I call it snot soon enough

It all depeends on what size glaze buctet you are using  as to how much to use-I often have 25 gallon or 10 gallons and also 5 gallons as well as well as  1/2 gallon buckets. The thing is this stuff is powerful-Use just  a little .

maybe a teaspoon in 5 gallons-the other variable is how much settling YOUR glaze Has? so there are no hard and fast rules .Floating rocks take more than lighter materials.

Glad you learned not everything on the web is right like in stock items.

If you can add the snot into a small amout of hot water it will mix very easy. Cold bucket of glaze require lots of power mixing.

Edited by Mark C.

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I got the Magma yesterday.  First try is that it doesn't dissolve at all in hot water by itself with manual mixing.  Time to hit the Goodwill stores for a blender.  Looks pretty similar to CMC so far,   A double match head size wouldn't float my iron wash.  Like my buddy says, "world's most fascinating hobby". 

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2 hours ago, CactusPots said:

I got the Magma yesterday.  First try is that it doesn't dissolve at all in hot water by itself with manual mixing.  Time to hit the Goodwill stores for a blender.  Looks pretty similar to CMC so far,   A double match head size wouldn't float my iron wash.  Like my buddy says, "world's most fascinating hobby". 

CMC usually needs to sit overnight before blending. May be the same with the Magma.

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Sit over night?  Dump it in the water and blend it the next day?  I've never had a problem with CMC assuming boiling water.  I had a blender before, but didn't replace it when it died.

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I use boiling water and a blender-I mix a cottage cheese container (size) worth and store it in that air tight clear container-it will desolve some plastics. Then I just add that snot amount to a small amount of really hot water to add to any glaze I need it in.Do not forget the instructions to add some small amout of copper to keep it from going off with organics(this info is online or used to be at big big ceramics  store website.

I have a printed copy from the old days if you cannot find those instructions.

CP what kind of job are you giving up??33 years it could not be that bad?

Edited by Mark C.

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I was a telephone systems technician.  Installation and service.  33 years ago it was all analog, then digital, then IP and now it's mostly cloud based.  As a field tech, it suited my personality well.  One of my sayings was There are 2 kinds of problems, people problems and technical problems.  I don't do people problems.  I was a pretty cool job for a long time.  As long as my customers were happy, no one really knew where I was or what I was doing.  Totally unsupervised.  I worked in lots of different environments.  Hospitals, lawyers, car dealers (the 3 worst).  For the last year and a half, I'm working from home, deploying phone systems remotely.  The phone system is in a data center, the connection is the internet and the phones are on the customer's site.  They have people in India doing this work also.  After 35 years in the trade, I have no more skill than a 5 year employee.  Probably less, because of attitude.  But pottery was there as a creative balance to keep me going and really it's a decent supplemental retirement income.  I really don't have the skills or artistic abilities  in ceramics to be a start from scratch and make it on standard kitchen ware.  Fortunately I didn't find pottery in my 20s, cause I would have thought it was ok to make 20-30k a year indefinitely.  It was a good job, but it's not there any more.

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