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Babs

Soluble metallic salts. Any one using them?

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Rereading a bit of Greg Daly's Glazes and Glazing, he mentions using soluble forms of metals when dwcorating. He does this to get a ubiformitl i.e. no speckles and spormts.

Does anyone do this and with what results?

He does warn with thin walked pots to decoration may travel to other side of wall

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Yeh typing on phone and not reading what I've typed can work against one.:-)))

Dont know re poisonous but Iasked just to see if anyone had examples. Greg has one image of a cobalt wash on a glazed plate. I haven't seen this any where else. But would be intriguing to decorate inside of pot and have the outside decorated at same time... 

I really tried with this one Hulk, be kind to old ladies :-)

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Carlton Ball explained in an old publication how soluble salts can be used in a solution and allowed to soak into craze lines. The pot is refired and the craze lines heal but the salts have migrated into the clay body and result in a feather like effect.

If I remember right craze lines are forced by using a midrange glaze on a highfire body and fired once to cone 6 or so. The pot is soaked for a short time, wiped clean of the salt solution and refired to cone 10 healing the craze lines but leaving the trails behind in the clay. They are tiny, tiny colloidal molecules from what I understand and must be used carefully.

"Decorating Pottery with Clay, Slip and Glaze" by F. Carlton Ball a Ceramics Monthly publication from 1967

He mentions it again in a bit more detail in "syllabus for advanced ceramics" a Keramos publication from 1972.

I appreciate this isn't what you were after but thought I could add it here for others to find.

@Marcia Selsor recently posted about using salts too. I'll bet she knows a thing or two.

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Babs, there is an excerpt from Gary Holt here where there is a fair bit of information regarding soluble metallic salts. I would strongly suggest looking up the Safety Data Sheet for each and every material you are thinking of using, carcinogenic levels of toxicity involved. Re colours bleeding through the clay, Holt writes of using an opaque liner glaze for vessels where this is an issue.

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I believe the Lark Book, "Alternative Firing Techniques" has a section devoted to using metallic salts; its been years since I read it, but I believe the author cited a fair bit of information regarding the much more toxic nature of the fumes. Not sure if you plan to do this in your electric kiln, or if in a raku kiln (more indoors, vs more outdoors), but if I correctly remember what was in the book, I think a very healthy amount of ventilation is in order, as well as a respirator rated for the fumes. Not sure about the handling of the materials during application though; might be all you'd need are gloves and a work surface that can be cleaned thoroughly and safely.

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I went to visit Gary Holt about 7 years ago. He explained his process and it does take more care and safety to work with the metal salts. His work is beautiful and it really has a  striking water colour effect.  It would be best if you had a  background in chemistry to proceed and had all of the personal protective gear and a good place to work.  Much of the metal salts are difficult to obtain. He works with southern ice and it takes multiple firings to complete each piece. I've been kicking myself for not buying a piece - just the how-to-video :(

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