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I "glaze" fired instead of bisque...


LogicalHue

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I've re-glazed something that's already been glazed before (once and under very different circumstances) but I've never glazed something that's been fired to cone 6 before glazing. I know that you can, but I don't know what to expect. Should the results be basically the same? I'm using all commercial glazes and these will, uncharacteristically, not include any combining or layering. The kiln only contained one project, for applying to something on the 28th, so technically I should have time to make new ones, but not to glaze these and then make new ones.

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Yes, you CAN do it, but will it turn out well.....not necessarily. The issue with glazing something which is now vitrified is that it wont suck the water from the glaze as you apply, which means it will have a very difficult time forming a mechanical connection to your pot. As well, the glaze, especially worse with commercial glazes (lots of additives which improve brushability; stay wetter, for longer), will likely run off the pot before it can dry. Lots of folks have tried numerous methods to get glazes to dry onto pots that are already glazed, or overfired like in your case. The only method which I have used and has worked well for me is to heat the pot in your kiln to around 150*, take it out, and glaze it. I like to spray my glazes onto "re-glazed" pots, and do it in thin "dry" layers. The glaze now too will be very susceptible to being brushed off, so any handling of the pot should be kept to a minimum.

If you can get the glaze to dry onto your pot, there are no guarantees that it wont shiver/crawl right off the pot during firing anyways.

As with most "re-do's" in ceramics; just better to make a new one! As you said, since you have time to make a new one, do it anyways, and try to reglaze the one you have done too. If you get only one good one, then thats all you needed, but if you end up with two good ones, then....woohoo

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  • 2 weeks later...

I did end up making a new set and glazing and firing both. The pre-vitrified pieces definitely had enough problems that they would have been unusable; one glaze crawled, one was just too thin, and on one of the insides the middle/bottom kept getting essentially cleaned off when I applied a new layer of underglaze and so it was awkwardly blank.

Of course my favorite piece out of all of them was from the set that got messed up - one of them was perfect - but I can't use it because I need a set. Perhaps I'll just keep it, because I love it.

Thanks for the help!

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