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docweathers

Color depth for encapsulated stains

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Could probably use titanium dioxide or a little light rutile to churn it up a bit?  Might make an interesting expirement!  Maybe add some strontium and use it over SCM?  Could do lots of experiments!  I like the earthy colors best, blue is about as experimental as I get.  The stains I have are Mason best black, a uspigments orange and one of the Mason yellows.  I'm very boring because I just use them with slip.

 

Edit: actually using them to stain slip is a way to add depth if you use a translucent glaze over the top.

Edited by liambesaw

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Thanks for the link to Leslie's webpage. She does some really nice stuff that I could only aspire to.

I don't have a specific texture I'm looking for. I would just like to make better use of encapsulated stains but I don't like the flat lack of depth in the color.

Any suggestions on how to easily make them more interesting would be greatly appreciated.

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Layering glazes could be a good solution. I do a lot of underglaze work, and I've found there are two things that prevent the underglazes from looking too flat and boring. One, make sure the cover glaze is thick so there's some obvious depth on the surface. Second, make the cover glaze slightly fluid so that it picks up a little of the underglaze and moves it a little. Perhaps these ideas could be used with your stains as well. Layering a clear or other transparent color over your glaze with stain may give the appearance of more depth and provide movement.

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Amazing what brush artists can do with coloring, layering and shadows actually. Definitely takes practice and an understanding of all the variables that go into firing clay and use of color. Wish I would have taken a better picture of this gem at the time. This is underglaze with a simple clear glaze over it on a Christmas platter. This takes a bit of observation and study of reflection in gems, which btw can be very scientific.

20190110_221225.jpg

Edited by Bill Kielb

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14 hours ago, neilestrick said:

Layering glazes could be a good solution. I do a lot of underglaze work, and I've found there are two things that prevent the underglazes from looking too flat and boring. One, make sure the cover glaze is thick so there's some obvious depth on the surface. Second, make the cover glaze slightly fluid so that it picks up a little of the underglaze and moves it a little. Perhaps these ideas could be used with your stains as well. Layering a clear or other transparent color over your glaze with stain may give the appearance of more depth and provide movement.

Great idea... I will give it a try

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