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Mindilee48

what is a good low temp cone to use for cone 5 glaze for an overglaze firing

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Hello I have a question can i fire a cone 5 glaze (black) on a already fired and glazed stoneware plate from Ramsbottom pottery to a different cone like 04 05 or 06 I am doing a christmas present for a dad for his daughter its just basic lettering on a plate because of time cone 5 glaze is all i have 

Edited by Mindilee48

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I don't think you'd like the results if you did.  Amazon can ship you glaze within a day or two, or a local clay supply store is just a drive away.  Maybe use underglaze if you have that?  Not sure, but firing a cone 5 glaze to cone 05 is probably not going to make you happy

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I wouldn't. The glaze probably won't melt very much if at all. Depends on what's in the glaze, but regardless I wouldn't call it food safe if it's under fired that much. You should get a glaze that's made for cone 05. Also no guarantees on what will happen with the original glaze. I would do some testing before jumping in to a gift.

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China paint is another option but traditionally not placed directly on food surfaces. Firing  temperatures are in the cone 017 range  and usually sufficient to soften the base glaze surface for reasonable  adhesion. There are many China paint colors NOT suitable for food service so decoration is often on the outside or the decorated object is for display only.

finally I have decorated or repaired using lowfire glazes  cone 04 / 05 range often firing down for multiple colors and layers. Again for myself this has been on the outside of wares as decoration. Low fire glazes can be durable and in many cases more durable than poorly constructed high fire glazes.

since none of us has an electron microscope at our ready disposal I personally like to stick with durable recipes when practical and err on the side of caution when doing decorating, layering etc....

personalization and lettering on the outside of something : my thought would be China paint or low fire glaze is likely fine following all the manufactures recommendations of course.

for plates often decorating at the rim has less risk than decorating towards the center of the plate. And as always all products need to be certified as food safe. No vanadium, barium, etc.....

I have personally used the Mayco stroke and coat glazes in this manner and they seem to work fine. They have a large pallet of colors. I am sure there are many others that work as well. Stroke and coat is carried by Blick art as well as larger hobby stores so it is very available for a rush project. A glaze fire to cone 04 in this manner can be pretty speedy.

just my add

Edited by Bill Kielb

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My wife used some paints that were formulated to be brushed onto CLEAN glassware, and then baked in oven. Cured Paints cant come into contact with food, but are supposedly dishwasher safe. Cured at 350* (or so, cant quite remember), any ceramics object you have will handle that temp with no issues, and will not bring the glaze into melt, so should yield good results with your paints/enamels. Id still test a small spot on the bottom of the mug before you go whole hog, but I think this would be the best option for you. Not sure what the actual name or brand of paints my wife used with this class of hers, but Im sure a google search will turn up something. They come in a wide range of colors. takes some practice to brush consistently; not a good flow to them. Stinky when they arent fired; some kind of suspension agent is used that I would apply outside.

When you bake the mug in the oven, put it into a cool oven and preheat together. Im sure theres directions to follow with the paints too.

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5 minutes ago, hitchmss said:

My wife used some paints that were formulated to be brushed onto CLEAN glassware, and then baked in oven. Cured Paints cant come into contact with food, but are supposedly dishwasher safe. Cured at 350* (or so, cant quite remember), any ceramics object you have will handle that temp with no issues, and will not bring the glaze into melt, so should yield good results with your paints/enamels. Id still test a small spot on the bottom of the mug before you go whole hog, but I think this would be the best option for you. Not sure what the actual name or brand of paints my wife used with this class of hers, but Im sure a google search will turn up something. They come in a wide range of colors. takes some practice to brush consistently; not a good flow to them. Stinky when they arent fired; some kind of suspension agent is used that I would apply outside.

When you bake the mug in the oven, put it into a cool oven and preheat together. Im sure theres directions to follow with the paints too.

Folkart ceramic and glass enamel

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