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laurieE

Best clay for large relief flat tile

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

Hi I will have a look at the make up of the clay I use. I am in spain so the brands are different. I am making tile murals in relief all the time and so far have had only minimal warpage. One thing I do do though is carve out the backs of tiles that get really thick. I will let you know.... Trina

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Look at your suppliers website for a hand building clay. I also wax the edges to keep them from drying too fast.

I could not find info on a Laguna #90 clay. They have 3 digits. I suspect you have a typo but are using a 900 series clay which is a ^5 stoneware.

I'd recommend using a groggy raku clay in the 700 series.

 

Marcia

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Look at your suppliers website for a hand building clay. I also wax the edges to keep them from drying too fast.

I could not find info on a Laguna #90 clay. They have 3 digits. I suspect you have a typo but are using a 900 series clay which is a ^5 stoneware.

I'd recommend using a groggy raku clay in the 700 series.

 

Marcia

 

 

Thanks Marcia,

 

I will talk to my clay supplier about that type of clay. I never thought about waxing the edges; that's a great idea.

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

Hi I will have a look at the make up of the clay I use. I am in spain so the brands are different. I am making tile murals in relief all the time and so far have had only minimal warpage. One thing I do do though is carve out the backs of tiles that get really thick. I will let you know.... Trina

 

 

Thanks Trina, I am especially concerned about getting the larger pieces to fire without cracking.

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Look at your suppliers website for a hand building clay. I also wax the edges to keep them from drying too fast.

I could not find info on a Laguna #90 clay. They have 3 digits. I suspect you have a typo but are using a 900 series clay which is a ^5 stoneware.

I'd recommend using a groggy raku clay in the 700 series.

 

Marcia

 

 

Thanks Marcia,

 

I will talk to my clay supplier about that type of clay. I never thought about waxing the edges; that's a great idea.

 

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Look at your suppliers website for a hand building clay. I also wax the edges to keep them from drying too fast.

I could not find info on a Laguna #90 clay. They have 3 digits. I suspect you have a typo but are using a 900 series clay which is a ^5 stoneware.

I'd recommend using a groggy raku clay in the 700 series.

 

Marcia

 

 

Thanks Marcia,

 

I will talk to my clay supplier about that type of clay. I never thought about waxing the edges; that's a great idea. I am using wc390 cone 5 clay from laguna

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yes, groggy clay will help. I'd be wary of raku clays, though, because they will probably not be matured at cone 5, and you may have glaze fit problems. 12" is not so large that a good cone 5 clay with grog won't work. Sounds like you're doing everything else right.

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe

 

 

Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it...

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe

 

 

Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it...

 

 

Hi laurieE,

 

I think kabe was actually offering to email you the recipe :D..... I have a suggestion, but it would probably be to much work, you can wedge grog into the clay yourself and keep the clay body you like. How much and the best way someone else would have to answer.

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe

 

 

Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it...

 

 

 

I wasn't going to send you the clay. I will give you the recipe. You could mix up enough to make a tile or two and see if it did what you wanted. You wouldn't need to make a 100 lb just enough for a test run. I fit doesn't do what you like you are out a few cups of ingrediente and some messy hands. If you are use to a certain clay body it is hard to try other clays. We become monogomamous to our clay. Ain't Clay fun Kabe

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe

 

 

Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it...

 

 

 

I wasn't going to send you the clay. I will give you the recipe. You could mix up enough to make a tile or two and see if it did what you wanted. You wouldn't need to make a 100 lb just enough for a test run. I fit doesn't do what you like you are out a few cups of ingrediente and some messy hands. If you are use to a certain clay body it is hard to try other clays. We become monogomamous to our clay. Ain't Clay fun Kabe

 

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Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...

 

 

I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe

 

 

Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it...

 

 

 

I wasn't going to send you the clay. I will give you the recipe. You could mix up enough to make a tile or two and see if it did what you wanted. You wouldn't need to make a 100 lb just enough for a test run. I fit doesn't do what you like you are out a few cups of ingrediente and some messy hands. If you are use to a certain clay body it is hard to try other clays. We become monogomamous to our clay. Ain't Clay fun Kabe

 

 

Thanks Kabe, I think that I will try a clay that my supplier has that has more grog in it but it still supposed to be the rich rusty brown color.

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Laure,

Where do you live??

 

I try to buy clay that is produced, dug out? fairly close to me.

Standard clays seem to work very well. I use their Sculpture 420 which is a cone 2-6 clay and is really forgiving. That is not to say you don't have to dry slowly and take normal precautions but it is one of the best sculpture clays I have ever worked with.It is very forgiving.

High Water Clay is more local for me but the Standard is my favorite for both big and small pieces.

 

Beth

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Laure,

Where do you live??

 

I try to buy clay that is produced, dug out? fairly close to me.

Standard clays seem to work very well. I use their Sculpture 420 which is a cone 2-6 clay and is really forgiving. That is not to say you don't have to dry slowly and take normal precautions but it is one of the best sculpture clays I have ever worked with.It is very forgiving.

High Water Clay is more local for me but the Standard is my favorite for both big and small pieces.

 

Beth

 

 

Hi Beth, I live in Michigan outside of Detroit. I use the Standard white 105 for my low-fire but it's been the Laguna/Miller clay for mid-range. I will research what you are suggesting since I have a supplier for that brand. Thank you for your suggestions!

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Laure,

Where do you live??

 

I try to buy clay that is produced, dug out? fairly close to me.

Standard clays seem to work very well. I use their Sculpture 420 which is a cone 2-6 clay and is really forgiving. That is not to say you don't have to dry slowly and take normal precautions but it is one of the best sculpture clays I have ever worked with.It is very forgiving.

High Water Clay is more local for me but the Standard is my favorite for both big and small pieces.

 

Beth

 

Hi Beth, I live in Michigan outside of Detroit. I use the Standard white 105 for my low-fire but it's been the Laguna/Miller clay for mid-range. I will research what you are suggesting since I have a supplier for that brand. Thank you for your suggestions!

 

This may not help much but I like sculpture mix which is quite groggy and I bisque at ^6 and fire at ^10. It has been my experience that lower fired tile is softer and does not make a good tile for floor tile. There a number of manufacturers who make sculpture mix. Another benefit of highly grogged clay is its stability in firing and in weathering. If you are in an area with numerous freezing and thawing cycles grogged clay ods up much better. Angelica Pozo has an excellent section in her book on the types of clays that are good for tile. Angelica also works and teaches in your neck of the woods I believe and she is very approachable: nice lady!

 

Regards,

Charles

 

 

 

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