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Kabe

Glaze peeling off pot

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I overlapped two glazes on the rim of a pot to get a good run effect and the top glaze shrank more than the first glaze and all peeled off like mud on a hot day and fell off the pot. Would the addition of a binder in the second glaze stop this from happening? or would I be better off looking at the mix of the two glazes an see if I can move their composition closer to being the same so thar they dry in the same fashion. ( not sure if I know how to do that but it would be a good education experiience) ain't clay fun Kabe

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I am going to jump in here, even though I am not claiming to be an expert. I know that sometimes if slip is not sticking, it is a flux problem, so you add moe feldspar. In your case, it could be a glaze thickness problem. The glazes together are so heavy that they pull each other off. A simple solution to try would be to take a cup of each glaze, thin it and then apply it. Also, make sure that your bisquware is clean before you apply the glaze. I dip mine in a bucket of clean water, and let it dry over night before I glaze.

TJR.

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Fell off before firing, or after? If before, you probably just got them on way too thick.

 

They fell off before firing. The top glaze adhered to the first glaze and peeled both off the pot. I scraped off the two glazes and reversed the order and they stayed on the pot. I was going to compare the composition of the two in an attempt to see if I could find a reason but the glazes are at a school I am working at and one of the glazes is in a bucket left over from a teaching change and they do not have the recipe. I do know the instructor who left and I may see if he might have a idea of what the recipe was. It could be the thickness although they didn't fall off when the order was reversed and I dipped them about the same. I like to put a real stable glaze on a pot and then really build up another glaze on top of it on the rim that way it will run but the stable glaze will stop it before it ruins a shelf. ( side note; Maybe this should be a different topic but, If you made a sort of a slip with a high silica content, a clear more or less and dipped the lower part of a pot in it, let's say the bottom half inch above your wax line, would it work as a brake to stop or at least slow down an ash glaze so it would pool at the bottom before it ran onto the shelf? Has anyone tried this?) One glaze is sort of a tomato red and the other is a stony matt blue. I am in the process of devoloping a good crayon box full of recipes so I'm sure I will find something similar to it in time. If I get the recipes I will attept to see if I can find a reason. (Don't hold your breath!) Thank you for the help. aint clay fun! Kabe (These are cone 10 reduction glazes and they should be fire in about a week if the glaze stays in place.) TJR... If I get the recipes I will compare the feldspars

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