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Duende

Glaze firing for spoons and other flatware

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Hello everyone, I’m a newbie here, my first post. I’m trying to find out how to make fully glazed spoons/salad servers.

The best solution I can find at the moment are some stilts with metal pins from Scarva. Hopefully they would just leave small pinprick marks in glaze? 

 

I’m handbuilding  in stoneware clay, planning to fire to 1240C. 

I’ve noticed that many spoons have been made with holes for hanging, but I gather that niochrome wire (sp?) would slump, under the weight? if I can’t find a solution for glazing fully I guess I’ll just glaze the spoons partially. Most of them I’ve inlaid slip patterns partially. Thanks for reading my query.

 
Edited by Duende
Adding tags, trying to reduce type size

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Give up the glazed everywhere thought-place spoon on a soft brick laying down. Make a curve into the handle so it only touches at the top edge and the middle of spoon bottom - wipe off some glaze at these points-but you can leave a thin layer. Fire on the soft brick and grind /polish the touch points until smooth  after firing .I have done this with larger ladles for decades at 2,400 degrees (cone 11)

You can also hang from wire but leave the hole clean with no glaze on a bead rack.

Edited by Mark C.

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I  Have never used a bead rack in my life.At cone 10 temps that stuff comes apart fast-

since you are firing to a lesser cone you could use one-If you have a lot of spoons forget the rack I thought you only had one or two.

Yes the wire will soon bend and they will slide into themselves

The soft brick works as the glaze breaks free of the brick (does not stick) and you smooth off the rough spots.

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We have had good results using crushed oyster shells - normally used as grit for chickens - as support of glazed items.  This technique developed from the use of sea shells as supports for fully glazed objects.  We fire to cone 10 in a gas kiln.  Should also work at lower temperatures.  The shells are converted to lime (CaO) and wash out of the glaze.  The rough spots require some polishing with a grinder or emery block.  

LT
 

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hello, duende,  the kind of brick used in electric kilns is soft enough to damage with a fingernail.  that is soft brick.

had a thought.   what if you get a single  soft brick and stick nichrome wire through it so there is a good, thick support for the wire.   something like 10 inch wire stuck into a 3 inch thick brick leaves 3 1/2  inches on either side for hanging the spoons.    maybe it would work using both sides of the brick.   

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On 9/8/2018 at 5:54 AM, Duende said:

I’ve not heard of ‘soft brick’ - is there a different term for it here in the U.K.?

The are called insulating fire brick (IFB) or soft brick. They are much less dense and therefore absorb less heat than typical hard brick (good if you want fast temp rise/fast cooling/less energy use and not good if you need to retain heat or cool slowly). Almost all electric kilns are made from insulating fire brick.

My suggestion for the spoons would be to buy some thick high temp wire and build your own "spoon hanger" out of Hawthorne or similar fireclay. Make it so that each spoon hangs with support on each side from an unglazed hole on the spoon handle. By making your own you will maximize the efficiency of firing/stacking space and ensure that the spoons are not all hanging together on a long span of wire.

Edited by tinbucket

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Fireclay will be slightly more refractory and have greater thermal shock resistance, they might last a little longer. If you don't have fire clay you could make it out of your usual stoneware. Build them sturdy and they should work. If I spent a long time on a single spoon I would be inclined to test my racks with some weight on them before firing a glazed spoon. Up to you. Maybe others can chime in. I have never done this, I just got the idea when you posted your question. If your spoons are light you could try them on a premade bead rack, but I would be weary of putting anything heavier than beads on a bead rack

Edited by tinbucket

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