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Framing a wall to hang extruder

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After two years of trying (and failing) to do-it-myself, I have finally hired a remodeler to finish building my studio. I have a small area of wall that measures about 15" wide x 8' high that I think would be a good place for an extruder. I don't have an extruder yet, but I'd like to have the remodeler install braces between the wall studs that I could screw the extruder to when the shop is finished and stocked with my new extruder. I don't expect to use it a great deal, so I'll likely purchase a low-mid range extruder. Can anyone tell me the general length of an extruder and a good height for hanging it? Can anyone make recommendations on an extruder to purchase? Thanks.

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After two years of trying (and failing) to do-it-myself, I have finally hired a remodeler to finish building my studio. I have a small area of wall that measures about 15" wide x 8' high that I think would be a good place for an extruder. I don't have an extruder yet, but I'd like to have the remodeler install braces between the wall studs that I could screw the extruder to when the shop is finished and stocked with my new extruder. I don't expect to use it a great deal, so I'll likely purchase a low-mid range extruder. Can anyone tell me the general length of an extruder and a good height for hanging it? Can anyone make recommendations on an extruder to purchase? Thanks.

 

 

Most extruder companies have specs on the hanging of the device, and often the wall reinforcement. I would look at what you might get, and check on line for support document. Once you now the height, a couple of 2X6 laminated together between the studs should give you top and bottom support, but check the specs with the extruder first.

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I have two extruders, one is an old Scott creek I got fromAl Johnson back in the day the other is a wall-mount Brent. I should add we really use these a lot for all handles.

 

The Scott creek has been highly modified as we wore itout. The barrel and frame is steeland it still original the broke frame last fall after over 3o years - I hadchannel wielded to the backside to stiffen. The head is now a Brent cap as that’s one of the best/quickest to change as well as one of the more solid. The handle has been all remade to work better.

 

The Scott Creeks are all redesigned and look good-they alsomake aluminum one now for porcelain with spring loaded cap. We like steel as it’s so durable. We only use porcelain and the rust fromthe barrels never shows up in finished ware. Both of these I have 4-inch round barrels and are steel-verysolid.

 

Both of these hold 10 #s of clay, which is something youshould look at when buying one. Someof the cheaper brands hold almost no clay, like 2-4 #s which is nothing. Make sure they are strong-solid-holdlots of clay-Its not my place to bad-mouth brands so I'll stick to the great onesI know well above.

 

As far as mounting, make sure to frame that wall with a 2x8 or2x6 on edge laminated together trapped by some standard 2x4s one on each side so the lags haveplenty to grab into and the whole wall will be solid. I just measured both of mine the barrel bottoms are about 50inches from floor and the top of extruders is about 80 inches-the handles go upmore with clay in them. They mountto wall about 5 1/2 feet from floor-each is a tad different as far as mounts-theBrent is wider and has a side attachment which sticks way out sideways on thewall. I'm 6 feet and my helper is5.4 so that is a consideration-your height?

 

My shop wall is covered by plywood, which also helps. I also mounted on wall all the stuff we use such as the dies and a mallet and the caps and hollow dies. All things to consider.

 

 

 

Mark

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After two years of trying (and failing) to do-it-myself, I have finally hired a remodeler to finish building my studio. I have a small area of wall that measures about 15" wide x 8' high that I think would be a good place for an extruder. I don't have an extruder yet, but I'd like to have the remodeler install braces between the wall studs that I could screw the extruder to when the shop is finished and stocked with my new extruder. I don't expect to use it a great deal, so I'll likely purchase a low-mid range extruder. Can anyone tell me the general length of an extruder and a good height for hanging it? Can anyone make recommendations on an extruder to purchase? Thanks.

 

 

Most extruder companies have specs on the hanging of the device, and often the wall reinforcement. I would look at what you might get, and check on line for support document. Once you now the height, a couple of 2X6 laminated together between the studs should give you top and bottom support, but check the specs with the extruder first.

 

 

 

Thanks, I'll try several websites for specs on hanging extruders. The one site I visited didn't even give overall dimensions on their extruders.

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I have two extruders, one is an old Scott creek I got fromAl Johnson back in the day the other is a wall-mount Brent. I should add we really use these a lotfor all handles.

 

The Scott creek has been highly modified as we wore itout. The barrel and frame is steeland it still original the broke frame last fall after over 3o years - I hadchannel wielded to the backside to stiffen. The head is now a Brent cap as that’s one of the best/quickest to change as well as one of the more solid. The handle has been all remade to work better.

 

The Scott Creeks are all redesigned and look good-they alsomake aluminum one now for porcelain with spring loaded cap. We like steel as it’s so durable. We only use porcelain and the rust fromthe barrels never shows up in finished ware. Both of these I have 4-inch round barrels and are steel-verysolid.

 

Both of these hold 10 #s of clay, which is something youshould look at when buying one. Someof the cheaper brands hold almost no clay, like 2-4 #s which is nothing. Make sure they are strong-solid-holdlots of clay-Its not my place to bad-mouth brands so I'll stick to the great onesI know well above.

 

As far as mounting, make sure to frame that wall with a 2x8 or2x6 on edge laminated together trapped by some standard 2x4s one on each side so the lags haveplenty to grab into and the whole wall will be solid. I just measured both of mine the barrel bottoms are about 50inches from floor and the top of extruders is about 80 inches-the handles go upmore with clay in them. They mountto wall about 5 1/2 feet from floor-each is a tad different as far as mounts-theBrent is wider and has a side attachment which sticks way out sideways on thewall. I'm 6 feet and my helper is5.4 so that is a consideration-your height

 

My shop wall is covered by plywood, which also helps. I also mounted on wall all the stuff weuse such as the dies and a mallet and the caps and hollow dies. All things to consider.

 

 

 

Mark

 

 

 

Thanks for all the info and suggestions. I hadn't thought about quantity of clay. I think the one I was considering (after only a cursory read) held 8 lbs, but I'll pay attention to that spec now that you've brought it up. I'm 5'7", by the way. I hadn't considered laminating 2x6s or 2x8s together, but I see your point, that screwing into a 3" thickness of wood is better than screwing into a single 2-by turned face side out. I certainly will ask the remodeler to do that -- I don't want to pull down the wall with my first extrusion!

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On the extruder....I'm a big fan and use mine all the time..in fact, am teaching a class where the extruder is central to our construction. Anyhow my advice: be sure it is mounted to studs, obviously. We have discovered it is key that it hangs absolutely perpendicular to the floor (and your shoulders so that you pull down the bar perfectly straight...makes for smooth extrusion). Mounting height will depend on size of barrel ..not too high so you can easily add the clay without reaching too high, but high enough so you can get the best leverage. I have a BRETT...have had it for 15 yrs...it's terrific..can be purchased on line from ClayKing.com. ($595) It has interchangeable dies in the base allowing endless possibilities....love it. Advice: go as big as you can afford. Good luck.

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I have the Northstar Big Blue extruder and although I don't use it often, it's great when I do need it. It holds 25# of clay and is gear driven with a wheel handle which makes it easy to extrude. The large die set makes up to 5" extrusions and I have the adapter and die sets to make the smaller extrusions. I always had trouble during class using the extruder with the pull-down handle....it usually took two people to pull the handle to make the extrusion and there isn't always another person around in my studio. The wagon-wheel style handle doesn't put as much pressure on the wall supports either. I'm really glad I made the decision to purchase this extruder.

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Guest JBaymore

I have a Bailey. Square. Lag bolted directly into the tripled up 2x4 wall studs.....so no header needed there.

 

I've had it about 30 years or so. Still works fine.

 

best,

 

..............john

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I have a Bailey. Square. Lag bolted directly into the tripled up 2x4 wall studs.....so no header needed there.

 

I've had it about 30 years or so. Still works fine.

 

best,

 

..............john

 

 

Had a Bailey in the HS studio for 25+ years, bought a second one about 5 years ago. First one was mounted on the protable frame, second to the wall-lower for shorter girls and guys. The first one had to have the arm/handle replaced and the thruster. Wore out the holes after the time. They were used heavily for one project in particular that had to be all extruder, and not with single pieces. We also had the large barrel for the large plywood dies. This did not get used often, but was nice to have when a student wanted to think big! Baileys are built like tanks, and really take a beating.

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I have a Bailey which I got about 30 or so years ago and I had a North Star in the studio where I taught. Both are square. I mounted my own extruder on a 4 x 4 post and now into a stud in my current studio. The mounting screws are about 4" long.

Marcia

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