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Bright ^10 glazes?

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I am looking for any good reliable high fire glazes that are bright red, blue or yellow, I've looked at a few different recipes online but almost all are low-mid fire, and I am stuck using the gas kiln at the college I attend, any suggestions for ^10 reduction?

Specifically I am looking for a good bright red and a good bright blue or turquoise.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

 

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I am looking for any good reliable high fire glazes that are bright red, blue or yellow, I've looked at a few different recipes online but almost all are low-mid fire, and I am stuck using the gas kiln at the college I attend, any suggestions for ^10 reduction?

Specifically I am looking for a good bright red and a good bright blue or turquoise.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

 

 

 

Why do you feel stuck with durable long lasting ware fired at cone 10?

I assume you are new to high fire glazes and you will find many of the colors you are asking about are far from reliable at cone 10

The reds are the hardest-yellow is sketchy at best-true turquoise in reduction is also very problematic

The blues are easy every fire

Are there dependable shop glazes you have access to at collage?

High fire colors are not like paint store colors like in low fire-many colors do not exist at cone 10

If you are new to high fire I would suggest getting a feel for the shop glazes before working with exotic colors as they can be extremely frustrating

You will have many pots or sculpture/art that does not look the way you wanted it

Are you firing the reduction kiln or others?

More info would help

 

Mark

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I agree with Mark as usual. I have to box up my work and haul it to another potter in order to fire in a gas kiln. Lucky you that you have a stoneware kiln to fire in.

You could fire at Cone six in an electric to get reliable reds and yellows that you buy in a jar. The gas kiln will give you rich colours but they are not predictable or consistent.Talk to your teachers. I think you are trying to attain something that would be better in oxidation. Ask your teacher the difference between oxidation and reduction.

Good luck! TJR.

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Lucky you that you have a stoneware kiln to fire in.

You could fire at Cone six in an electric to get reliable reds and yellows that you buy in a jar. The gas kiln will give you rich colours but they are not predictable or consistent.

Good luck! TJR.

 

 

I tore down my gas kiln 4 years ago and have never missed it. Cone 6 can give you just as much richness and beauty, plus additional reliability. And many glazes in a jar are quite beautiful, too. I came from the typical university system that said cone 10 reduction was the only really acceptable method of making pots. 15 years later, I'm very disappointed in that aspect of my education, because in the real world cone 10 reduction is the least accessible method of firing. But that's another thread.....

 

Bright yellows and reds are touchy at all temperatures. If you have to fire cone 10 reduction at school, then start testing copper reds. Bright yellows are easier at cone 6, using stains for colorants. Bright blues can be had using cobalt or stains, at just about any temperature.

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Lucky you that you have a stoneware kiln to fire in.

You could fire at Cone six in an electric to get reliable reds and yellows that you buy in a jar. The gas kiln will give you rich colours but they are not predictable or consistent.

Good luck! TJR.

 

 

I tore down my gas kiln 4 years ago and have never missed it. Cone 6 can give you just as much richness and beauty, plus additional reliability. And many glazes in a jar are quite beautiful, too. I came from the typical university system that said cone 10 reduction was the only really acceptable method of making pots. 15 years later, I'm very disappointed in that aspect of my education, because in the real world cone 10 reduction is the least accessible method of firing. But that's another thread.....

 

Bright yellows and reds are touchy at all temperatures. If you have to fire cone 10 reduction at school, then start testing copper reds. Bright yellows are easier at cone 6, using stains for colorants. Bright blues can be had using cobalt or stains, at just about any temperature.

 

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Based on talking to some of the ceramics students who have taken the class multiple times and a few of the aides, we are using long high temperature reduction starting somewhere around cone 10 and going for several hundred degrees of reduction, resulting in an abundance of dark colors, and it makes it easy to have any color you want as long as it is brown or blue. I've been thinking of using a few dark red glazes we have that are iron and copper based and using a little cadmium to possibly brighten the color slightly, but from what I have heard, my teacher frowns on using the toxic cadmium and lead based glazes, reguardless, would cadmium brighten our red glazes or lead to something unexpected?

 

 

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Based on talking to some of the ceramics students who have taken the class multiple times and a few of the aides, we are using long high temperature reduction starting somewhere around cone 10 and going for several hundred degrees of reduction, resulting in an abundance of dark colors, and it makes it easy to have any color you want as long as it is brown or blue. I've been thinking of using a few dark red glazes we have that are iron and copper based and using a little cadmium to possibly brighten the color slightly, but from what I have heard, my teacher frowns on using the toxic cadmium and lead based glazes, reguardless, would cadmium brighten our red glazes or lead to something unexpected?

 

 

 

 

Depends entirely on the glaze formula. Test, test, test....If it's an iron red, I don't think the cadmium would do much. A bit more bone ash might help, though. If it's a copper red, it will probably screw up the formula. If I was your teacher, I wouldn't allow Cadmium in my studio, end of discussion. The color of your clay is going to have a huge effect on the final outcome of the glaze, too. If you're using a dark clay, then yes, all your glazes are going to be dark.

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