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To sand or not to sand-try sponging


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We used sand everything over 20 years ago on our production work here in the studio-it was dusty and a mess-Since the early 90's I wet sponge all work-it works great on all phases of greenware-especially bone dry pots

My helper and I sponge them all while loading a bisque kiln-we fine stick point any handle cracks as well on handle forms

No need to sand-try damp sponging and dip into water to clean as you go. Its faster as well

Mark

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Great for smooth clay bodies, but be careful on bodies containing sand, grog or fireclay. The sponge will remove the fine particles and expose the large, leaving a rough surface. To be honest, I think sponging every pots is unnecessary. If you do a good job during throwing and trimming, most everything should be good and smooth before it dries. It only takes a few extra seconds with a flexible rib (I use metal ribs) during throwing or trimming to get everything smooth as can be.

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Great for smooth clay bodies, but be careful on bodies containing sand, grog or fireclay. The sponge will remove the fine particles and expose the large, leaving a rough surface. To be honest, I think sponging every pots is unnecessary. If you do a good job during throwing and trimming, most everything should be good and smooth before it dries. It only takes a few extra seconds with a flexible rib (I use metal ribs) during throwing or trimming to get everything smooth as can be.

 

 

Good points as we use porcelain mostly-we only sponge the rough spots-not every pot-I should have clarified that

This works with grog bodies just be easy and sponge lightly -I do it on stoneware salt pots-=the trick is just a little

And to be honest the main point is to stop sanding and creating dust

Mark

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Great for smooth clay bodies, but be careful on bodies containing sand, grog or fireclay. The sponge will remove the fine particles and expose the large, leaving a rough surface. To be honest, I think sponging every pots is unnecessary. If you do a good job during throwing and trimming, most everything should be good and smooth before it dries. It only takes a few extra seconds with a flexible rib (I use metal ribs) during throwing or trimming to get everything smooth as can be.

 

 

Good points as we use porcelain mostly-we only sponge the rough spots-not every pot-I should have clarified that

This works with grog bodies just be easy and sponge lightly -I do it on stoneware salt pots-=the trick is just a little

And to be honest the main point is to stop sanding and creating dust

Mark

 

 

For years I have used what I call scungy pads-similar to the ones used to clean non stick cookware. I particularly like the centers out of industrial floor scrubbers. These come in a variety of grits. I usually sand with a fine one before bone dry, but after leather hard. I do wear a mask. Sometimes I forget to sand and do it just as loading the kiln. I much prefer the other method as there is less dust.

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My mugs often after being handled and covered overnight will have a small crack on one side of the attachment point top or bottom or both.

This happens if I or my assistant handle them-hers crack on other side-we are both right handed-no matter how we change things we often get this small attachment crack

To fix this I use a sharp pointed wood trim tool (like a kemper 6-8 or 10 inch wood modeling tool)

or I have some homemade bamboo sticks with sharp points on them

Anything that will fit into a tight crack which we rub out while in the green state

Hope this is clear?

Mark

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Thanks Mark,

I did not know I could "rub out" those cracks. I had some of those today, and I slipped and scored and had to add a small roll of clay to hide it.

Pretty tacky of me to try and repair it like that. I wish I had read this post earlier today! I have the bamboo sticks, and some of the mugs are

leather dry hard. I will try the rub out. Not sure how deep to go, but I will give it a try.

Juli

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Guest JBaymore

................ and an emery cloth at bone dry. The emery cloth is dusty, but I've never been able to get the same results with out it.

 

 

 

I'd maybe suggest getting the book "Artist Beware" by Dr. Michael McCann and reading it. Also "Keeping Claywork Safe and Legal" by Monnona Rossol. They should be in every potter's library.

 

best,

 

.................john

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My mugs often after being handled and covered overnight will have a small crack on one side of the attachment point top or bottom or both.

This happens if I or my assistant handle them-hers crack on other side-we are both right handed-no matter how we change things we often get this small attachment crack

To fix this I use a sharp pointed wood trim tool (like a kemper 6-8 or 10 inch wood modeling tool)

or I have some homemade bamboo sticks with sharp points on them

Anything that will fit into a tight crack which we rub out while in the green state

Hope this is clear?

Mark

 

 

 

To fix fine lines and smooth, I use the Kemper Wipe Out Tool. It has a different silicone rubber tip on each end. I like the results I get with it. There are a lot of shapes for different uses by other brands also. I learned about these while dabbling with polymer clay. biggrin.gif

 

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post-6591-132828443305_thumb.jpg

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I use a terracotta stained black slip - so I fully understand the issues with fettling ware. I cannot dry sand, as it will leave scratch marks. The risk of inhaling the dust particles is also an issue for me. So I wet sponge. I use a 2 bucket method. One is the dirty sponge, other the clean water. I only wipe the sponge once over a surface before I change to a clean area. Sponge is kept quite wet. This gives me a smooth uniform surface.

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