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oldlady

DIY spray booth with waterfall

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i did use the search function for " spray booth" and was given 68 places to look at either spray or booth.  spray+booth gave no answer at all.

i am looking for an older post by someone who built a waterfall type using a plastic barrel and bucket with pump.  was it by dhpotter?   

last week we had 7 days of rain, sometimes so hard that when drops hit the ground they bounced 3 feet.  since i spray my glazes outside, i was unable to do much last week.  it is time to build a spraybooth.  i want the kind that allows water to wash down the walls directing  the overspray into a drain with a recirculating pump.  i have saved the instructions for building one designed by Tom Turner but was hoping to go a little smaller.  

anybody know the post i am talking about?  thanks

Edited by oldlady
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Is it the response from j_tex that you are looking for? Copy below:

 am 98% finished with my spraybooth that I (finally) tackled during the holidays...I've had the materials collected for about a year but was just a little too intimidated to start. I shouldn't have worried; it's GREAT and works fantastically. I, too, looked for years at spraybooth designs and having taken two Steven Hill workshops over the last 12 years I was/am sold on the idea of spraying. I cobbled together a few low tech boxes w/filters and fans over the years but they were a temporary solution at best. If I couldn't come up with a dependable, functional spraybooth I knew I wouldn't get the repeatable results and high quality glazing that I was after. I became convinced that a waterfall spraybooth was the design that would fit my requirements the best because it is the most efficient design at containing the overspray and would help me avoid drilling a hole in my garage wall (brick). It uses a shop vac to create negative pressure in the booth instead of a fan and is on casters (like everything else in my "garagio").

 

I ran across Joe Dillett's waterfall spraybooth videos about 14 months ago on YouTube and joined Pottery Basics in Yahoo Groups so I could download the detailed construction drawing that goes along with the three videos. (


is the first one... the other two are linked from it.) Joe is very personable and corresponded with me by email when I had a few questions; he is a very skilled woodworker so he has great fabrication skills but you can have just average "wood butcher" skills (like me) and still get the necessary results. My cuts just aren't as beautiful as his... I liked his use of the plastic tank in lieu of a shower stall because I couldn't find a cheap enough shower stall (new OR used) and liked the idea that the tank lets you have doors that close it up when not in use.

 

I won't go into the details of the booth; they're all there on the videos. I don't know if the materials are within your budget, but here are the major items of expense:

160 gallon polypropylene water tank (available locally to me so I picked it up) ... $170 and it is 31" dia x about 5 ft high.

Six brass hinges and a hasp closure (Home Depot, about $40 total)

Aluminum reflector work light (Home Depot, $20)

25" x 26" piece of 1/4" Plexiglass ($35.50, cut for me by my local glass and mirror company) ... picked this up this afternoon

Assorted pieces of 1-1/2" and 1/2" PVC pipe and fittings ( Home Depot, probably $40 worth because I bought pre-cut 24" pieces of pipe instead of cutting my own from long lengths)

Two movers dollies from Harbor Freight (8.99 each when I caught them on sale) I connected these together side by side with long pieces of 1x2 wood screwed into them... the booth sits on them and can be rolled around.

Large fountain pump (692 GPH with 11' max lift) from Harbor Freight ($49.99 online but $37.50 after my 25% off New Year's Day coupon at my local HF store)

Misc copper and plastic tubing clamps (less than $5), spare bucket for the pump to sit in, $8 of plastic sheet for the work light to sit on, etc.

Shop vac and compressor (I already had them)... and $14.95 noise-cancelling ear muffs from Harbor Freight: they use AA batteries and cancel out sounds above 90 dB, allowing me to stop worrying about the noise the compressor plus shop vac make --- since I don't have the option to put the compressor in another room.

 

Good luck in your search; I know it's hard to get what you want within a reasonable budget but you will find it if you keep looking.

 

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fred, you ARE sweet!  what a nice movable setup the round tank makes!  there is a manufacturer of this kind of tank in winchester so maybe i can find just the right size for my needs, thank you.

i like the first video and joe is very exact in his explanations.  for a first video it is well done.  he checks his notes to make sure to cover everything which makes it perfectly clear.  love his door cutting sequence, makes so much sense.

i do not find a second video link but will look for it a little later.  need some breakfast right now.   ooooh  a hen turkey just walked past my front yard and there is a rabbit out there, too.  and MORE rain.   sigh..................

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Thanks Fred for the video!

OldLady my spray booth uses a shower base and plastic cardboard for the walls and ceiling. It is NOT waterfall but only takes 15 minutes to clean using a garden hose and a large bucket situated under the drain hole in the shower base. The bucket gets heavy with water and I use a dolly to move it outside to empty. Total about $160. This amount included a 50 cfm fan. This fan was woefully underpowered. Found a 160 cfm fan. This fan cost about as much as all the other materials combined!

I think my setup can be converted to waterfall. Need the sump pump and tubing. And would like to see the other 2 parts of Joe's video. He has thought this out pretty good.

 

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Ok, Oldlady, et al-

The three videos in the series are listed below. They should be in the proper order. (Note: I took the address from the first video, and put it into YouTube search, and then found the other two)  Anyway, they are below:

Regards,

Fred

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where did they go??   i saw these listed above this afternoon but was unable to follow up right then.  now they are gone!:huh:  oh, fred,  how sad after all that work.  thank you.

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On 5/22/2018 at 10:17 AM, dhPotter said:

Thanks Fred for the video!

OldLady my spray booth uses a shower base and plastic cardboard for the walls and ceiling. It is NOT waterfall but only takes 15 minutes to clean using a garden hose and a large bucket situated under the drain hole in the shower base. The bucket gets heavy with water and I use a dolly to move it outside to empty. Total about $160. This amount included a 50 cfm fan. This fan was woefully underpowered. Found a 160 cfm fan. This fan cost about as much as all the other materials combined!

I think my setup can be converted to waterfall. Need the sump pump and tubing. And would like to see the other 2 parts of Joe's video. He has thought this out pretty good.

 

Normal design velocity for a paint spray booth to entrap the particles adequately is 100 feet per minute entrance velocity which means for a 2’ X 2’ open area or 4 sq. Ft. Would require a 400 CFM fan. This fan would likely be larger actually as the piping will decrease the actual fan capacity.

so the lesson? Use your mask, regardless, 160 cfm still is likely undersized.

Edited by Bill Kielb

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Have replaced that bathroom fan with a box fan with 2300 CFM. Have also converted the dry spray booth to a waterfall spray booth. This was easier than expected. Only needed a pond pump, clear plexiglass, a 2x4 stud and some PVC piping. It works OK. I left an 8 inch gap from the bottom of the plexiglass to the shower base for the fan to suck the air thru. Have dialed the fan back to Medium speed. It seemed the High speed wasn't pulling any more air thru than medium speed. But, there still seems to be glaze spray lingering in the booth. Maybe not a big enough air gap? Oh yes, where the mask, always.

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59 minutes ago, dhPotter said:

Have replaced that bathroom fan with a box fan with 2300 CFM. Have also converted the dry spray booth to a waterfall spray booth. This was easier than expected. Only needed a pond pump, clear plexiglass, a 2x4 stud and some PVC piping. It works OK. I left an 8 inch gap from the bottom of the plexiglass to the shower base for the fan to suck the air thru. Have dialed the fan back to Medium speed. It seemed the High speed wasn't pulling any more air thru than medium speed. But, there still seems to be glaze spray lingering in the booth. Maybe not a big enough air gap? Oh yes, where the mask, always.

Because a box fan is not designed for suction, it will reach a point where all it does is chop static air, I'm guessing that point is somewhere between your low and medium setting.

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1 hour ago, liambesaw said:

Because a box fan is not designed for suction, it will reach a point where all it does is chop static air, I'm guessing that point is somewhere between your low and medium setting.

Air separates or become unattached from the moveable wing ............. propeller stall? Who would have thunk you were an aviator or Bernoulli follower? LOL ..... nice analogy, I like it!

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