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A finished piece from this week.

Prototype dinner plate for a disabled family member, she has partial use of one hand, paralyzed on the other side. Theory is she will be able to push her fork to the curved in back edge of the plate t

Wedding jar completed except for cleanup a little after it sets up some more.   best, Pres

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From Labor Day's glaze firing

Clockwise, top left,

  Test tiles for "waste" glaze (retained, settled, sieved and adjusted cleanup, wipe off, etc. - just over 1.5 gallons; it's "free!"), crazes over these clays, may fit buff and red clays better, tbd

  New lower expansion liner glaze (per recent entry to https://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/19922-clay-composition-and-crazing), goes on well, looking good so far - more testing required. I'm not minding the specks, which may be from petalite, as all the other ingredients have been used in previous low expansion trials...

  Am still liking the Lakeside Clear Blue, here over white clay; the lower part is BVG Rutile Green, which mutes the carved red slip - will be trying this again.

  Really liking this tin chrome red, here over Cassius. This firing, no bloating in the black clay pieces, likely due to extended bisque (longer holds at critical temps).

  Selsor Faux Celedon (with some minor coe adjustment) over buff clay - really like this look.

 

9_20_coli.jpg

Edited by Hulk
'spec' specks
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More from Labor Day glaze fire,

Clockwise, from top left

  Tortilla warmer in Cassius. I took a closer look (with magnification), see now that the clear glaze that "clears" the bubbles fairly well over the black clay also crazes (my vision ain' great); have finished the one bag, may not buy more...

  Storage jar, ~7.5 inches tall, same Rutile Green

  The two mugs are same Selsor Faux Celedon, same white clay - the seven o'clock one is from previous bisque and glaze firing, the five o'clock one appears similar (the colours are actually about the same - camera settings, not), but very little crazing, just a few spots! Hard to believe that firing  (more thorough bisque and a bit cooler glaze with slower initial cooldown) could make that much difference!? Same clay, same glaze. ...more testing...

9_20_colii.jpg

Edited by Hulk
my "vision," heh; spell Selsor correc'ly, sorry 'bout that!
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More from Labor Day glaze fire,

  Clockwise, from top left

  Covered dish, just over a quart.

  Same  Rutile Green.

  Five of fifteen small bowls in red clay (SRF).

 

Overall, am happy with this load! Still working on tossing pieces to reclaim that don't look and feel "right" - making progress there. Detailed notes are definitely helping! Looks like a longer bisque and a bit lower glaze fire target temp (plus slower cool to ~1850) has cleared up a few issues. Also looks like lower expansion clear is working on the cafe as well as the two white clays. Not decided yet on continuing to work in the red clay, perhaps just thin layer of slip over the better behavin' buff, and white (and somewhat behavin' cafe) clays. Can definitely see where calculated coe numbers could be deceptive - as a comparison/guide, where making limited adjustment to a glaze, helpful; for comparing glazes that have very different recipes, not as helpful.

 

9_20_coliii.jpg

Edited by Hulk
oh yeah, calculated coe values and pinches o' salt
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Bench is covered with orders for shipping out. mailbox (extra large box) is full with 5 boxes going out today. Packing UpS boxes today

going to Colorada-Washinton and Arizona states also SF in Ca.. 

Made deliveries yesterday to 4 Organic super markets.

another bisque on Sunday and glaze on Monday-business is off the charts for pre xmas

I can feel already that I will get redlined  on shipping this fall and may have to slow or shut it down so I can get work done.

I knew this business was recession proof now I know its pandamic proof as well.You just have to get your stuff in front of the customers. My local gallery who can only let in 3 customers is selling more pottery than last year at this time. The markets are doing the same as well.

I'm back to full time reluctantly .

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I had a great time last weekend glazing a full 8 piece dinnerware set.  Opened the kiln a few days later to crawling on 75% of it.  I had a feeling something awful would happen when I saw a few cracks in the glaze; smoothed the cracks in and fired anyway.  

So this weekend I'm throwing another 8 piece dinnerware set and defloccing the glaze this time.

 

 

1600969670522_copy_1080x1150.jpg

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Also hit the pottery supply place and picked up another half ton of porcelain... Yes... Another stoneware potter caught the porcelain bug...

Could be worse I suppose, but I finally found a porcelain that I love.

CKK6 from Seattle Pottery Supply, great stuff if anyone in the Seattle area has been looking for a good throwing porcelain.  Not translucent or anything but glaze looks fantastic on it and it doesn't turn to a puddle when you're throwing.

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  • 2 weeks later...
13 hours ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

@Benzinerinsing them in my house means they get eaten very quickly. I had to smack a few hands to keep my photo props! 
People tell me they rinse and store in them just fine. 

Ah!

I just wasn't sure if storing them in a bowl that has extra air flow like that, helped keep them longer.  We get berries at the super market, and they come in those plastic clam shells.  They have to be eaten quick, or they turn to mush/ grow mold.

I've heard some people rinse them with dilute vinegar to prevent mold, but wasn't sure if that was one of those "hacks" that doesn't actually work.

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40 minutes ago, Benzine said:

Ah!

I just wasn't sure if storing them in a bowl that has extra air flow like that, helped keep them longer.  We get berries at the super market, and they come in those plastic clam shells.  They have to be eaten quick, or they turn to mush/ grow mold.

I

Yeah, they come in the clamshells here too. The berry bowls do seem to help with the mold situation, but they can dry out a bit if you leave them more than about 3 days. When you use them for grapes and things that tend to be more robust, it keeps the ick factor down better. 

Honestly, when I first started making them, I thought they were a bit gimicky, but I made them because people asked. I find ours is in almost constant use.

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I make mine with separate drain platter. I have given several sets at Christmas time, and found many people use them for all sorts of fruit on a counter or table, others for rinsing berries and grapes or other small fruit.  I hadn't ever considered suing them as a steamer on the stove in a lidded pot, but will consider it next time we do mussels.  I put an inside swirl line using a small rounded wooden tool to make a nice groove from bottom to top, then put a series of holes following the swirl line getting larger as they move toward the rim. I also flair the rim as in most of my bowls so that it is easy to lift them without a handle.

 

best,

Pres

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