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moonlight

Is This Kiln Too Small?

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Greetings everyone! This is my first post.

 

I'm wanting to start a hobby studio, I've been making pottery for a few months now and think I am ready for a low-cost studio in my small space. I have been online obsessing over different wheels, and have been drawn to the Speedball Artista, considering that I can sometimes find it online for 200-250 dollars. I found a listing that offers an Artista wheel and a Skutt KS-609 ($500 for wheel and kiln, I will have to drive 6-7 hrs to get it too). ​From what I can see, Skutts are great, but I'm worried that this kiln is too small. The big plus ​is that it plugs into a standard 120V outlet (of course, with a dedicated fuse). It has a 9"x11" internal dimension. Anyone have experience with this kiln? Is this a good price for both? What stuff could I fire with it?  

Thanks for helping me find and finally acquire a wheel and small kiln.

-Adam

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That is the size of my test kiln. You can get maybe 10 mugs in there depending on how small. More for Espresso cups. Jewelry projects work for that size. For the 120 v does not mean every day common usage type of wiring. When I move to Texas I plugged in my test kiln and fired it as I had it Montana. The wiring in Montana was heavier duty. Never had a problem. In texas it melted the outlet. I am lucky it didn't cause a fire. I had the wiring upgraded when I wired my kiln shed. Check the needed amps for the kiln and add 20% for the size of the circuit breaker. You should have a dedicated line.

Marcia

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Guest JBaymore

For most of those larger 110 VAC test kilns......... you really want a 20 Amp breaker... which is NOT 'standard house wiring' in most places.  And the gauge of wire from the 20A breaker to the outlet is larger than is typical on a 15 A 110VAC circuit too.  At least 12 G up to about 30 feet.... 10G for longer runs.

 

best,

 

......................john

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Moonlight - I have done the very same thing over the past year. Took a pottery class a one ago and was hooked! I set up a tiny studio in a spare bedroom, starting with a wheel - the Speedball Artista. I love it. I usually make smaller pieces 1-2.5 pounds, and it is small enough to move out of the way when I need to fire my kiln. (Did I mention my studio is tiny?)

 

One year in, I got to the point where I needed a kiln at home. Driving back and forth to the center where I take classes to drop off and pick up my pots during the week was taking up too much time. I have a Skutt KM818-30A and fired it for the first time last weekend with perfect results. I can fit about 30 of my bud vases in it. The advice I received was to get the biggest kiln I could afford, fill every two weeks or so, and accommodate in my space. I have my kiln on wheels, so it is rolled out of the way when not being fired, only about 3 feet or so.

 

If you can, I would get a kiln that operates on 240v. Installation of the circuit was about $650, but completely worth it. I tried to figure out how I could fare with a 120v kiln, but it just wasn't practical for me. You will quickly outgrow a smaller kiln.

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