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Marc McMillan

Union between a potter and a painter

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Good Morning,

 

My friend is a painter who until recently has always painted on canvas. We were chatting over vino one day about the differences dimension ads to the artform and thought about me throwing a piece and her painting the piece using acrylics. It's probably not a new idea, but it was new to us. I threw her a platter and bisque fired it. She presented me with the piece last night and its wild and she loved the process. The owner of the restaurant we were in wanted to buy it straightaway. We plan on exploring this joint union between dear friends and their unique passions. We loved the fact that her signature is on one side and mine is on the other. Our learning process yielded the information that a glazed piece would be better as the bisque work absorbed the acrylics. I should have thought of that.

 

Beyond the story, I have a question. She wanted to see about putting finished painted pieces back in the kiln to add some cracking and perhaps bubbling. I have absolutely no idea what temp I would need to fire to in order to achieve such an objective so I ask the question here to see if anyone has ever attempted this or heard of it attempted. Our next step is for me to fire up some test tiles for her to paint.

 

 

Thanks for any input on this "sort of" pottery question.

 

Happy Friday,

 

Marc

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Good Morning,

 

My friend is a painter who until recently has always painted on canvas. We were chatting over vino one day about the differences dimension ads to the artform and thought about me throwing a piece and her painting the piece using acrylics. It's probably not a new idea, but it was new to us. I threw her a platter and bisque fired it. She presented me with the piece last night and its wild and she loved the process. The owner of the restaurant we were in wanted to buy it straightaway. We plan on exploring this joint union between dear friends and their unique passions. We loved the fact that her signature is on one side and mine is on the other. Our learning process yielded the information that a glazed piece would be better as the bisque work absorbed the acrylics. I should have thought of that.

 

Beyond the story, I have a question. She wanted to see about putting finished painted pieces back in the kiln to add some cracking and perhaps bubbling. I have absolutely no idea what temp I would need to fire to in order to achieve such an objective so I ask the question here to see if anyone has ever attempted this or heard of it attempted. Our next step is for me to fire up some test tiles for her to paint.

 

 

Thanks for any input on this "sort of" pottery question.

 

Happy Friday,

 

Marc

 

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THese are the things about pottery and painting I love!!! Good question. I would say from my experience you can add bubbles crackling effects ect but I would need to know more about the piece and what temps you have already been firing at. I know more about low fire glazing and working with engobles slips and oxides. I have been known to fire items numerous times to get things the why I want them. I am a pretty unorthodox potter and experiment all the time. Look forward to hearing back. I am new to this site can you attach a pic of the piece? All the best Trina

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Guest the smilin' potter

Using paint on ceramics is not at all a new idea, I am afraid. I say that because I too thought it might be unique. Ken Price has been doing it for decades, and perhaps Picasso or Miro even before him.

I don't think that technique has any less validity or potential, even though it's been done! I usually burn it out at 1938F, but sometimes it still leaves a faint ghost of color.

So your temperature is going to be less than that, perhaps half that, or a little more. Anyway, it gives you a rough idea, I hope.

I also thought of the judicious application of a propane torch to achieve the same type of effects, but I have yet to try it. (Yes, you might crack the piece, extremes in temp, blah blah blah) but you will not know until you give it a shot. I bet you could make it work!

Sounds like fun, good luck!biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif

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THese are the things about pottery and painting I love!!! Good question. I would say from my experience you can add bubbles crackling effects ect but I would need to know more about the piece and what temps you have already been firing at. I know more about low fire glazing and working with engobles slips and oxides. I have been known to fire items numerous times to get things the why I want them. I am a pretty unorthodox potter and experiment all the time. Look forward to hearing back. I am new to this site can you attach a pic of the piece? All the best Trina

 

 

 

 

Thanks. I love it too. I especially love having the opportunity to collaborate with a dear freind and talented artist. We are both learning about our respective passions. Regarding the firing process: I use a white stoneware and typically bisque to cone 04 and fire to cone 5 or 6. She is using acrylics. I'll see if I can upload a pic. she definitely has a unique style.

 

 

Best!

 

Marc

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Using paint on ceramics is not at all a new idea, I am afraid. I say that because I too thought it might be unique. Ken Price has been doing it for decades, and perhaps Picasso or Miro even before him.

I don't think that technique has any less validity or potential, even though it's been done!

I use Daler Rowney acrylic inks on some of my pieces, and the advantage is that I can burn it out if I don't like the look. I usually burn it out at 1938F, but sometimes it still leaves a faint ghost of color.

So your temperature is going to be less than that, perhaps half that, or a little more. Anyway, it gives you a rough idea, I hope.

I also thought of the judicious application of a propane torch to achieve the same type of effects, but I have yet to try it. (Yes, you might crack the piece, extremes in temp, blah blah blah) but you will not know until you give it a shot. I bet you could make it work!

Sounds like fun, good luck!biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif

 

(dire safety concerns and other hand wringing posts soon to follow, I bet.)

 

 

 

Yep. I didn't think it was new, but we definitely enjoyed it being new to us. :D Thanks for the temp thoughts. I plan on doing a bunch of test tiles and will definitely try a torch and/or heat gun on it.

 

Thank you,

 

Marc

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Those of us who sculpt have used acrylics for years. We water it down for soft watercolor effects or use it straight from the tube for in your face brights. Not good for food service articles. For that, use underglazes and cover with a clear glaze.

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Those of us who sculpt have used acrylics for years. We water it down for soft watercolor effects or use it straight from the tube for in your face brights. Not good for food service articles. For that, use underglazes and cover with a clear glaze.

 

 

 

I also like to use stain glass window paints, you can get some lovely pearl effects and some really vibrant colors. Agreed not for food containers!

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