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How Would An Imprinted Name Come Out Saggar'd?


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Hi all,

I make custom urns with names impressed into them like the greenish bluish one shown. A woman wants an urn saggar'd like the one shown, and wants a name impressed. I have never done this before, and dont know if the name will come out a funky odd color and if where the name is imoressed will. Be a weak point, and perhaps crack in the saggar process?

Has anyone imprinted something into a saggar pot? Can it be done? If so, concerns?

I let her know I was not sure about this at all, but I'd check. Thanks!!

Nancypost-6053-0-30879100-1483916671_thumb.jpgpost-6053-0-47886600-1483917079_thumb.jpg

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post-6053-0-47886600-1483917079_thumb.jpg

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Can you do lettering cut out of a paper label so it burns off and leaves an imprint? Like with a Cricut. Or maybe stuck on with flour paste and wooden laser cut letters? What would happen? OR you could sort of smush them into the side of the pot slightly when leather hard so they also leave a  slight imprint. 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/50-Miniature-Laser-Cut-Wood-Letters-Scrapbooking-0-75-/162065741689

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Can you do lettering cut out of a paper label so it burns off and leaves an imprint? Like with a Cricut. Or maybe stuck on with flour paste and wooden laser cut letters? What would happen? OR you could sort of smush them into the side of the pot slightly when leather hard so they also leave a  slight imprint. 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/50-Miniature-Laser-Cut-Wood-Letters-Scrapbooking-0-75-/162065741689

I don't know! Im not really up on how saggar works. I learned to do it, but i dont know what would leave a mark and what wouldn't?

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Can you do lettering cut out of a paper label so it burns off and leaves an imprint? Like with a Cricut. Or maybe stuck on with flour paste and wooden laser cut letters? What would happen? OR you could sort of smush them into the side of the pot slightly when leather hard so they also leave a  slight imprint. 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/50-Miniature-Laser-Cut-Wood-Letters-Scrapbooking-0-75-/162065741689

I don't know! Im not really up on how saggar works. I learned to do it, but i dont know what would leave a mark and what wouldn't

Try it on something little!

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am i not following this question correctly?  isn't a saggar just a container used to protect the pot inside from flame and ash deposits?   how would the lettering be affected if i am correct in thinking this?

I'm referring to the firing of bisque with sawdust, and copper, etc. You put copper wire on the piece, also. It isn't glazed. 

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Can you do lettering cut out of a paper label so it burns off and leaves an imprint? Like with a Cricut. Or maybe stuck on with flour paste and wooden laser cut letters? What would happen? OR you could sort of smush them into the side of the pot slightly when leather hard so they also leave a  slight imprint. 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/50-Miniature-Laser-Cut-Wood-Letters-Scrapbooking-0-75-/162065741689

 

 

FWIW, my wife did experiment in our first firing with your suggestions.

 

She tried rubber stamps and metal die stamps, both left a nice imprint on a small tile. These were only bisque fired and she thought them boring so she never glazed them. The edges held up well and she is considering doing something with wording.

 

I tried a paper laser print and pasted it on with gum arabic. The toner has 50% iron oxide and the images I used was a 48pt bold letter B and a 72lpi halftone (photo). I applied the paper on one tile before it was bisque fired and a second piece after the glaze was brushed on. In both cases the letter B almost completely vanished and the halftone didn't show up well. Something to experiment with more.

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