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nelsonpots

repairing bisqued ware

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I've had great success repairing clean breaks at bisque, and after glaze firing using the same clay body + paper pulp + magic water. In one case with a porcelain piece that was destined for the bin I added tiny cut up pieces of fibre glass cloth (assuming it was silica and would melt) just to see what would happen and it worked well.

After just reading an amazing answer to a question about bloating on another post in this forum, i have no technical idea why it worked.

There are very clever people here who maybe could explain the 'why' part.

cheers Lyn

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Magic water (from Lana Wilson):

 

1 gallon water

3 tablespoons liquid sodium silicate

1 1/2 teaspoons soda ash

 

Putting the soda ash into a cup or so of the water and heating in the microwave dissolves the soda ash nicely. Mark the container clearly that the contents are not consumable.

 

 

Another concoction for repairing bisque is "spooze" (originally attributed to Peggy Heer by Vince Pitalka):

 

Mix equal parts by volume vinegar, corn syrup, and powdered claybody. Add more powdered claybody to adjust the thickness of the spooze to your need. Both surfaces should be dampened to assist adhering. Some add toilet paper pulp to the mix.

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Paper clay is majic, majic, majic. I have repaired everything from itty bitty cosmetic cracks to ugly, ugly cracks, and so far, so good. With the bigger cracks, I roll a paperclay coil or two, to fill the space, then smooth it in with paperclay slip. Bisque it again, and I have been very happy! I use the majic water to make my paperclay too.

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I've had great success repairing clean breaks at bisque, and after glaze firing using the same clay body + paper pulp + magic water. In one case with a porcelain piece that was destined for the bin I added tiny cut up pieces of fibre glass cloth (assuming it was silica and would melt) just to see what would happen and it worked well.

After just reading an amazing answer to a question about bloating on another post in this forum, i have no technical idea why it worked.

There are very clever people here who maybe could explain the 'why' part.

cheers Lyn

 

 

 

Thank for this tip. Your going to laugh, but I heard of this before. But, I didn't add any paper pulp. Duh:P. I need to slow down and read more carefully. What is the ratio, if you don't mind. Thank again for the great tip.

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Thank for this tip. Your going to laugh, but I heard of this before. But, I didn't add any paper pulp. Duh:P. I need to slow down and read more carefully. What is the ratio, if you don't mind. Thank again for the great tip.

 

 

To a cup of clay I would add 6-7 'squares' of toilet paper and 1/4 cup magic water, let it stand for a while to mush up, then I put a hand held blender in and thoroughly mix it.

Others may have different 'recipes' but this is my ratio. I have had 100% success using this method and Marcia's tip of wetting the bisque is a great one, otherwise it drys way too quickly and you lose your shaping time.

have fun Lyn

 

 

 

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I add 30-40% shredded paper by volumn. So, if I have 1 cup of slip, I add about 1/3 cup of wet cheap toilet tissue that has been all shredded up. Nothing exact about this recipe.

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I have a question for the folks that have had success with the paperclay/magic water repairs. If the break in the bisque is a clean, sharp break, how do you handle putting the paperclay to make the repair. I have tried this before, and if I put the paperclay on the break, then it makes the surfaces of the break no longer match and did not work for me. If I build up around the break, then it gets ugly real fast.

 

As a substitute made up a solution of sodium silicate, Elmer's glue, and clay dust (bisque fired already works best if you have it to reduce shrinkage issues) with some paper pulp in it, wet the bisque area to be repaired and put a minimal amount of my "stuff" in the break, more around the break, and after it dries, or after bisque firing again, carefully try to bring the original surface profile back to the piece. My success rate with this is not good, and unless I have a lot of time invested, it is not worth my time. My time would be better spent making a new piece.

 

Enough people have had success to warrant this type of repair be explored further, so what am I doing wrong? What kind of break does this repair work with the best?

 

John

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I have a question for the folks that have had success with the paperclay/magic water repairs. If the break in the bisque is a clean, sharp break, how do you handle putting the paperclay to make the repair. I have tried this before, and if I put the paperclay on the break, then it makes the surfaces of the break no longer match and did not work for me. If I build up around the break, then it gets ugly real fast.

 

As a substitute made up a solution of sodium silicate, Elmer's glue, and clay dust (bisque fired already works best if you have it to reduce shrinkage issues) with some paper pulp in it, wet the bisque area to be repaired and put a minimal amount of my "stuff" in the break, more around the break, and after it dries, or after bisque firing again, carefully try to bring the original surface profile back to the piece. My success rate with this is not good, and unless I have a lot of time invested, it is not worth my time. My time would be better spent making a new piece.

 

Enough people have had success to warrant this type of repair be explored further, so what am I doing wrong? What kind of break does this repair work with the best?

 

John

 

Hi there, well i use paperclay to repair lots of things and have had both good and bad results. I find that it works great for sculptural items where you can add even moreto cover breaks ect. My success rate has been lower when i have tried to repair pots or plain items. I have also found that paper clay also effects the way the glaze sets in the repaired spot. I do tend to agree with you though , let go of the failures. Trina

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