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wmdonovan

Extruding Kiln Stilts Vs Slip Cast Stilts

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I have been thinking about making my own kiln stilts on a large scale for low fired ware. Roselli uses molds and slip casts their stilts, I am fairly sure. Is there a benefit to this method? I was thinking about extruding mine and cutting them down to size. I cant see a downside; faster turnaround time, less initial time spent in preparation, no need to keep large quantities of slip or molds laying around, etc.. Am I missing something though? I've never made my own stilts or even used them, though I understand the premise. Any insight is much appreciated.

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Like most things, by the time you factor in time, materials, firing etc, it is usually cheaper to purchase them.

 

The question is, do you want to spend time making stilts or making pottery/art/having fun?

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Well, I work for a Pottery tool, and equipment supplier,  and we have been purchasing all of our stilts from other companies for years, and have recently though it would be more economic to make our own. In this case, it is not cheaper to purchase them if we can make them ourselves as we sell literally thousands annually.

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Well, I work for a Pottery tool, and equipment supplier,  and we have been purchasing all of our stilts from other companies for years, and have recently though it would be more economic to make our own. In this case, it is not cheaper to purchase them if we can make them ourselves as we sell literally thousands annually.

 

Ahh, in that case....

 

I have made stilts, using my usual ^6 clay, just roughly formed into three legged starfish, and sharpened pieces of ex bicycle spokes - stainless steel.  They worked, and are still working, but that's all I can offer you.  Good Luck.

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I can tell you they are cut to final length after firing on a wet saw. I also think they are ram pressed.These are the ones you but in various lengths .

Stilts need a high degree of compression strength so the body need to hold up well at all temperature including high fire as  most are made with all temps in mind.

If you are thinking about the triangle or squares  bought by the inch the above applies .

 

Since you have not mentioned temperature I looked up Roselli and they fire to 2400 degrees

If you are talking about the star shaped wire points then slip casting is your friend but ram pressing will be a lot stronger.

More details on what you are thinking about would help

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(Am I missing something though? I've never made my own stilts or even used them, though I understand the premise. Any insight is much appreciated.)

you said

I would think since your buying wholesale and in large volumes why in the world would this make sense?

Your resale other products would be enough.

If your are manufacturing other products in say wood this also does not make sense.

​You should try a batch and see if it is easy.You are coming from a never made or used them place which is setback prone to say the least.

 

Not trying to be negative only truthful . Let us know how this turns out for you?

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I don't know who you work for but I think it's a great way to find out exactly what the folks you supply have to go through to try to make any money. You'll learn soon enough that the only people who make any money in this business is you guys, the supplier...that is until you start manufacturing... ;)

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