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Stephen

Just How Old Is Too Old For A Kiln?

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9 hours ago, terribleterra5@yahoo.com said:

I have two big kilns to give away not sure about them they were my mothers and she is dead and I hate to throw them out free to anyone who can pick them up in Richmond California By March 18, 2020 Please text 510-688-2475 

A description of the kilns would be helpful...pix too...

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My first kiln was a Skutt 1227 made in 1958, replaced the elements and a couple of bricks and worked fine. Only reason I replaced it was 2 years ago was that I found a 1 year old 3" brick 1227 Skut , an Olympic kiln and a bunch of other stuff too cheap to say no.

 

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Yesterday I took a look at an L&L built in 1973. It needs elements and a wiring upgrade (still has the old waxed cloth wires), but it'll be good to go after that. The customer also had another L&L from 1964 that was still functional. Age means nothing, condition means everything.

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I have one from the late 70's. I do my best to make repairs often and keep it in good working order replacing elements, switches wiring blocks and wiring as needed. Replace lids and bottoms also. Not a whole lot of work, I do happen to have an L&L, and the bricks get very little wear.

 

best,

Pres

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I readily concede that old kilns last a long time if they are kept in top condition.

Of course the flip side of that is that if you invest in a new kiln now and keep it in top condition it may well last you for the rest of your life so unlike something like a new car there is value in that.  Shortly after I started this thread I came to the decision that it was worth it to me to just buy a new one. That was a few years ago and I got a new Skutt 1027 for just under $2500 with vent and tax and I picked it up and drove it 2 thousand miles to Texas. The used ones I found that had electronic controllers (non starter for me) were a grand or so the savings would have been around $1500 and I put the first miles on it. Since a lot of used kilns will need a new set of elements sooner than later and maybe some minor repairs the extra cost was probably really under a grand when alls said and done.  At least that is how I justified it:rolleyes:

In addition to starting with a new kiln I also was able to pick out the right kiln for me. Shopping the used market I was pretty much trapped in whatever was available and since I was adamant about having an electronic controller that meant little choice (the cost of external controllers or the retrofits available at the time really made buying new a no brainier).

All of that said if I was broke I would get the best $200 manual kiln I could find and move on.  

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