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Foxden

Press Molded Tiles/trivets

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I recently made a few tile/trivets for our personal use. They involve substantial carving so selling them doesn't make financial sense with the time involved. I decided to make some plaster press molds of my originals and now am faced with a dilemma.

 

Should I mark them #1/X and limit the series of pressings to a specific number and destroy the mold or just make them and not indicate they are one of many duplicates. As a person in clay I understand the difference but do you think it matters to buyers?

 

Also, if it is a limited run, what is an acceptable number? 25, 50, more, less?

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Hi Foxden (ace name)

What are they like?

Just had same conversation with my manager who says it all depends on long term prospects. If say they the tile is of cats then it's likely to be a good steady seller for ever so a good passive income. If however you are going down the artist route rather than the artist, then like painting prints you numerous them as a special run. The great cheat is you can reproduce another run later on as long as that's numbered sepately.

How big your target market and how where you going to sell?

Best of luck

darran

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Well I say make all you want. I doubt most buyers care. Post some pics - would love to see them. 

 

Any tips on trivets not being too slick? I have made a few but find pyrex or other dishes sort of slide around on them. Coarser clay or unglazed parts or texture?   rakuku

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I don't anticipate selling a ton of them although initial reactions have been good. I am concerned about passing something press moldied off as handmade. The original was of course done by hand, the mold made by me and each one is individually trimmed and glazed by hand. These aren't slip cast from commercial molds but they are nevertheless reproductions of an original.

 

Does making it a limited run appear more desirable or should I just not make an issue of it?

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Rakukuku, they are my version of cuerda seca glazing, where glaze is inlaid in depressed areas and raised areas are left as bare clay. I guess the non-glazed clay keeps things from slipping. Also because the trivets are fired flat and glazes are within a depression I can use glazes without concern for running.,

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I do not think it matters to any pottery customers. Ceramics is not the same as other art fields like print making.

The only exception if you are selling  only one offs. Say ceramic sculptures.

Weather you make 250 or 25,000 it should not matter to anyone really.

Since every one will be a bit different glaze wise they all are different.

Limited runs I feel are for folks in other mediums .

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Foxden:

 

How about option #3?  You stated a great amount of time was spent detailing/carving these trivets. So that would make them several steps ahead of garden variety trivets. Perhaps not a limited edition, but how about a "special edition," or " collectors edition," or even an "artist edition"; in lieu of limited edition. By giving them an upgraded title, then you could justify an upgraded price for the time you put in.

Nerd

 

Raku: Dal Tile and Florida Tile both made a commercial floor tile that they added plain ole grog to the glaze for non slip surfaces. Maybe??

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Guest JBaymore

Have you looked at the pricing for commercial ceramic work in nice department stores?  Made mostly by jigger, jolly,hydraulic dry pressing, slip casting, and injection slip molding.  I would price them at what you think they should be priced as the quality of the OBJECT, as well as with a slight consideration for the COG aspects and the labor factor.  Just don't market them as "each made totally by hand forming".  If it makes you feel better, put "press-molded trivet" on the hangtag.  If someone asks how they are made... be truthful.  Simple.

 

Remember that "designers" get to charge a lot because ...well........ because they are "DESIGNERS".  But the objects sold are often totally machine made.  But it is good DESIGN of the object.  It is the design work that is the key.

 

best,

 

................john

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Comparison shopping:

 

Nerd

 

Give some  thought to a custom stamp    "Collectors Edition" by ...or whatever tag you wish to assign. Collectors like bragging rights.

>> or use these printed on gold foil  " special edition"...... 1000 for less than $20

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Nerd, you have quite the flair for marketing. I wish more art schools included promotional aspects in their curriculum.

No way I would sell or make a thousand - of anything. I enjoy working in clay and have for years, but luckily it was never a a direct source of income. If anything, I flit from one thing to another. I enjoy the challenges I face with each new form or project. The mold making of my trivets, for example, was enjoyable as I had to venture into the world of plaster. Learned a few things along that route!

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Guest JBaymore

I wish more art schools included promotional aspects in their curriculum.

 

We do.  :)

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