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talhaumar

What Clay To Use To Make Waterfall For Cat And How To Use Clay?

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Hello guys, 

 

My name is Talha and I am new to this forum. I like arts and crafts of all sort and am taking little bit of knowledge + practice from high school art 1 and 2 class to work on random projects.

 

Recently I have been wanting to make a waterfall for my cat. My cat likes to drink water out of my mom's vase (made of clay) which has a money plant in it. He has a plastic waterer, but he does not use it at all. So I thought id make him a waterer with a plant in it. 

 

What clay should I use? I saw one clay at michaels and it was an air drying one. Should I go with the classic clay that needs firing? If so, how do I fire it at home? Also, It will need a glossy finish inside and out, so it can hold water (right?). Is the final piece going to be safe for the cat? are there any paints that I should use that are safer for pets or after firing it does not matter?

 

Any input will be appreciated!!

Thank you all

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You will need a clay that is fired to maturity. That is if its cone 06 clay then fire to cone 06. or cone 10 clay fired to cone 10. You will need a glossy (shiny glaze that is lead free to cover areas that have the water in them.

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You need some education before you can start on a project like this.  You could start by taking some classes at a community art center,  they will have a kiln there to fire your work in.   The clay you bake in your oven isn't real clay it is full of chemicals that could harm your cat.   Denice

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talhaumer, if the object is to have something for your cat, why not just find a potter who will make what you want?  ceramics study is very involved, it is not like going to Michael's and getting a few items you put together.  your cat might die of old age before you are skilled and knowledgeable enough to make what you describe.

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Cats are notoriously sensitive critters when it comes to chemicals, etc. Anything you use must be safe for use with human consumption use, as well. The clay must be food-safe and fired to maturity, as Mark C. pointed out; and the glazes used must also be food safe as well. Denice has some good advice regarding finding the right classes for that project. Fountains are fun little projects, but you do have to do your research to make sure your pet is safe.

 

There are some wonderful pet fountains available at high end pet stores - I would get one for your cat. You are absolutely right to encourage her to drink water and to use whatever tricks you can to get he to do so - cats don't have the thirst mechanism that we or dogs do, and rely upon their own food consumption for water. I have to admit that my own trick (as recommended by my vet) has always been to feed canned food and water it down a little more. I've had great luck with that program and antique 20 year old kitties. (Well, at this point I just have my young ten year old whippersnapper...but my cats live a long time!)

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We bought a waterfall to encourage our diabetic cat to drink more water. A couple of lessons learned:

 

If you are in a hard-water area pre-boil the water or you will spend forever removing "tide-marks".

 

You will get hairs in the water that will finish up blocking the pumps filter (nasty to clean too). Much better

to enclose the pump in a fine-mesh plastic bag to catch the fur.

 

But it was a great success, and gave him a few extra months.

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Check out Youtube for interesting tabletop fountains that you can make using found objects. Most commercially made serving bowls (look in thrift stores) used as bases will be food and pet safe. Add a small pump (in a mesh bag is a good suggestion) behind a clean rock pile or small sculpture. I refill mine from a filter pitcher, but it still gets hard water rings which can be removed by scrubbing with a toothbrush and a paste of vinegar and baking soda.

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I have had many cats and a many fountains-the pumps will die 1st. They need to be cleaned weekly.Some cats like the river of falling water but many like the tide pools.

By a few pumps so when they die you have another.I do not think a planter and water fountain are a good mix as far as washing out in soaps hot water.

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