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Qotw: What Does It Need For You To Look Beyond Your Own Nose?


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I just had a visit from the eldest kid of my gardener. The kid (Lucio) is six years old and he told me at length how to cut back olive trees and roses ;) ... (I don't have roses by the way)

 

But on to the next QOTW: a few days ago our Marcia asked in another thread

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/14600-how-many-people-here-subscribe-to-magazines-like-ceramics-monthy-studio-potterclay-times-ceramics-review-new-ceramics/

 

... and I learned that people from the US for instance only read US magazines. Since I am writing articles for a European magazine (which is availabe also in English, and one can subscribe also to an oline version) I am curious why nobody looks "beyond one's own nose". What does it need for you to look beyond your own nose? No offense meant! :) 

 

Have a great week everybody!

 

Evelyne

 

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I guess access if my best excuse. I have often picked up magazines when in college libraries, or when traveling, to get another point of view. I am pretty voracious in my reading habits, and often will dig into an article unfamiliar, or with a bar over my head just for the knowledge, or letting me know how much I don't know. I read US Ceramic magazines, because for me they are easy access. At the same time, always wondering how much when something is listed in differing currency. Just laziness, I know, but an example would be the RAW editing program I use for camera has a pro version for sale at 28020Y.

 

So for me, probably access, and convenience.

 

best,

Pres

 

 

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I just posted a thesis link from the University of Denmark. I have read  papers from Japan, Germany, France, Austria, Canada, and England. Although I have many articles from the clay arts trades, I have read technical papers from the technology, paper, paint, and rubber industries. Every circuit board is covered with a zinc/silicate coating- surprise!! #94 premium white copying paper can have as much as 30% kaolin. Paint uses clay, titanium, silica, iron, cobalt, and a host of other metals. Rubber tires have a fair amount of ball clay. Have been working on an oxidation red that I hi jacked from the technology sector. Back in the 60-70's, they used yttrium doped with samarium and iron to produce the "reds" in TV sets. Of course the glass arts always has interesting info: have incorporated many of their techniques as well. One of more interesting articles of late came out of a University in NC: self glazing porcelains. The primary use is industrial, but I can see that application in the clay arts.

 

Nerd

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I'm a little bit like Glazenerd. I went to a lot of trouble to get an out of print book by a prof from Norway about soluble metal salts. If it is something that you really need then you go the extra mile to look beyond your nose! In other words, its all about content.

Roberta- yes it counts! We Canadians are exotic & foreign   :blink: and so are our publications (hehehe).

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Nerd, I found the best technical info on oil burners in German technical books back in the early 70s. I have read ceramics Review from UK, and Ceramica from Spain. Not now though. I use a lot of Facebook links to Ceramica del Mundo and so on. I subscribed to Evelyne's magazine but the hard copy which comes months after the fact. For all magazines I am moving to online versions. It just took about a month to get the kinks out of my online subscription to CM.

Marcia

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I gave up reading all ceramic magazines, they distract me from the work I am focusing on.   The field of ceramics is so broad that I feel the need to pick an area that I have a intense interest in.  I usually  change after 9 or 10 years, I am not as dedicated as those who spend their whole life working in the same area. Looking beyond my nose sends me in a thousands directions.   Denice

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I look for and like to see work and articles & videos from other countries, when they are easy to access online.   However, I no longer spend money on books or magazines or subscription fees. Even if I wanted a single issue of Ceramics Art Monthly, for example, the nearest bookstore is 30 miles away and that would be probably the only clay publication they would carry. I love the rural life, but I do miss a real city sometimes!! 

 

@glazenerd: ball clay in tires !!!??? Learn something new every day LOL  Self-glazing porcelain? Can't wait to order some! 

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LeeU:

I have already been playing with self glazing porcelain: looks promising but also would be limited to certain techniques. When I have played with it, Chris Campbell always comes to mind with her hand building technique. Where did she go anyway?

 

The pic is deceptive: it is not nearly that glossy: just camera flash from being too close. The finish is rough, some places smooth, others slightly rough. Then again I just started playing with it. I could see 5lb pugs of a variety of colors used to build pieces. This piece I cut 3/4" by 6" long strips and twisted them together before I rolled them flat. Possibilities yes, but a ways off from being usable. Very crude pinch pot.

Nerd

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I'm with Denice. The "technique of the month" pulled me in to many different directions so I too gave up subscribing. I still find bits useful information in the few ceramic books I purchased.

 

Before the internet I spent a lot of time at the library and used the inter-library-loan service for books not in our local library.

 

Now I concentrate my searches on aspects of ceramics I want to pursue, but still enjoy reading about work and techniques of other potters.

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I like to see what others are doing and what is going on in the world. I am on about 10 ceramics focused groups Facebook pages. The magazines are really accumulating. We are beginning to downsize this type of clutter. I do like the communication in the mags though , so I get them online. There are also show competitions which I do enter every so often.

Marcia

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For many years I subscribed to New Zealand potter but gave it up in the middle 80's.

I have many books from english authors in ceramics. My main issue is many recipes call for materials I have no access to I'm sure its the same the other way as well.

Some things work well worldwide others not so good.

As I get older I want less stuff and subscriptions  are one of those items.

The other thing is I'm focused on porcelain high fire in reduction and salt firing-I'm not say very interested in Raku anymore and this is true in many areas with clay so my focus is in what I'm working in. Low fire in Spain or toledo Ohio does nothing for me.

But I was fascinated with Marcia's article on the fumed wares last month at least in the technical aspects of the fuming-maybe as I have done fuming several times myself in salt cool downs.

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Ceramics Art & Perception is my closest periodical to anything I can identify with international content (Australia is quite a distance from the end of my nose *grin*)...and I consume that regularly.  The reviews of international artists are my favorite features.

 

Other than that, I try to collect books, booklets, and web publications on Mesoamerican ceramics and still have an odd attraction to articles/books about ceramics from marine archeology.  There was a time when major international ceramic exhibitions published booklets (many not in English) and I peruse those in our library for inspiration occasionally.

 

The timing of this QOTW may be coincidental, but a review of Jason Briggs' work in Spanish found its way to me this week.  I count Jason as both friend and instructor...and it is interesting to read what someone from a different culture thinks of his projects.

 

Peace,

-Paul

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