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clayshapespottery

Work Tables

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I'm building a new studio and will be getting new work tables - I visited a studio once where the work tabletop looked like it was a sheet of drywall, inset in a wood frame. Seems like a good idea  - for absorbing some moisture. Just wondering if it might degrade easily with wear and tear. I do slab work exclusively. Thoughts? Favorite work surface? (for rolling and forming clay - not glazing).

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You could also look into Hardie Board instead of drywall as that would definitely stand up better, though you'd want to make sure and support it well. I've always been partial to heavier weight canvas, but that aligns with how I used tables in the studio (minimally).

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Yes, I don't think the drywall would be strong enough for wedging - at the moment I wedge on a piece of MDF on top of my work table, which I find to be a very good work surface as well, for rolling out slabs. Only mentioning the drywall as I saw it on a studio table a while back...and was wondering if anyone else used it. I would think it would crack under the repeated pressure of a rolling pin...just wondering others experience.

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i use printers blankets on several different work surfaces in the studio to roll out slabs, work on things.  THEN i put the pot on drywall sheets that serve as storage for drying.  

 

my work is mostly flat slabs that are fairly thin, less than a quarter inch thick, so the drywall helps dry the pots evenly in this humid environment.  once dry, the pots are waxed and set on wire to be glazed.  photo shows bare drywall shelf plus some wire ones with waxed pots.

post-2431-0-45002900-1465961533_thumb.jpg

post-2431-0-45002900-1465961533_thumb.jpg

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"Hardieboard" is a fiber-reinforced cement material.  ("Hardie" is actually a brand name - there are similar products from several manufacturers.)

 

There are different types of cement-board - made for underlayment for tile floors & walls, or for exterior use as siding or soffit.  It comes in thicknesses ranging from 1/4" to 1/2", depending on intended use, in sheets from 3' x 5' to 4' x 12'.  If you go with the cement-board, I would recommend using one that's sold for flooring (usually 3'x5').  Regardless of which type/size you get, as nathanhinshaw said, it will have to be evenly supported.

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