Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Bioman

What Would Work Best?

Recommended Posts

I find that find that lifting shelves out of my Olympic 28/27 (circular 1/2 shelves) is a pain in the back.  As I get older I don't think this will get better.  I need a few more shelves anyways as my work tends to be shorter and I am not fully utilizing all of the space.  So I figured I would buy some lighter weight shelves and gradually phase out the old ones.  Currently I use mostly cone 6 glazes but will occasionally do an end soak which can register as cone 7.  I am looking at CoreLight shelves as a possible solution?  I would love something that is non-stick like Carbide but have never seen anything but square/rectangular and here they can have moisture issues.  Is the CoreLight optimal or are there better solutions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CoreLight are great! I love mine. They're a little thick, so you lose some space, but they are a great compromise between cost and weight compared to the Advance shelves. Advancer do come in all shapes and sizes if you go that route.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Skutt 1227, which has 12 facets on the 28" diameter interior wall .  I'm also researching replacing my heavy shelves with some that are lighter.  Will  26" diameter corelite half round shelves work on the interior since they are a smooth sided 1/2 round with no facets to match the interior?   I'm concerned that  I may loose finger space in lifting them in and out and also about loosing square inches of space for the pots. What do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you will not lose finger space with round shelves.  think about that extra point where the circular shelf does not go.  losing shelf space for ware is only going to happen if you do not let things hang over the edge.  how close do you come to the edges now?  do you expect that to change?

 

if you want to see how a 26 inch half round looks and fits in your kiln, cut one of cardboard and try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CoreLight are great! I love mine. They're a little thick, so you lose some space, but they are a great compromise between cost and weight compared to the Advance shelves. Advancer do come in all shapes and sizes if you go that route.

Neil, do the advancers have any issues with moisture.  I ask only as I have heard that some carbide shelves hate moisture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to find half-shelves to be easier to handle, plus there is flexibility for varying heights in different halves of the kiln.  Our full sized shelves are about an inch thick and I dread having to set one of those things near the bottom of the kiln.

 

Advancer shelves may mean saving nickels a while longer, but I have seen them in use and understand why people like them so much.

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Paul.  A few questions:

1.  At cone 6 to 7 is there any reason any normal glaze would stick.  I really like the idea of "not having to kiln wash".

2.  If I fire bisque, I assume the moisture present is so small to not be an issue interacting with the carbide shelf??

Everyone seems to like advancers.  If they don't cause issues with either of the above it may be a good present to myself come the holidays ;)

In the meantime I think I will get a few CoreLite shelves to increase short term productivity; I can afford them in the here and now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

whatever you have heard about advancers should be checked with the people who know, the manufacturer.  call them and talk to someone about your concerns.  i bet you will find that they are telling people not to store them where they can get wet as opposed to worrying about moisture in pots on the shelves while firing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Advancers cannot get wet or if they do they need to be very slowly dryed out.They do conduct electricity so do not let them touch elements.

My friend has a kiln full of 1/2 shelve advancers for his electric they are the best, take less space ,never warp, glaze runs never soak in,They are light as a feather, cost less in the long run and take cone 10 while remaining perfectly flat forever.

I have over 50 of the 12x 24s in my two gas reduction kilns . If you fire often they make the most sense if you are a hobbyist than they may not pencil out unless you fire often or have back issues .If you cannot keep them dry I would not get them (I live in a rainy climate-52.5 inches so far this year and store mine outside on a dry surface out of rain and they work fine) I would use the 1/2 shelves as they give you better stacking options.

They cost a lot but in my view are well worth it but I'm a professional who makes my living firing and selling pottery .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JBaymore

Another plug here for Advancers.  Yes, they do come with built in "sticker shock".  But there are a LOT of advantages.  There IS payback there.  As they say "you get what you pay for".

 

I too am "maturing".  Or maybe we'll call it "ripening".  Aw crap.... I'm getting old too.  And I find Advancers a real pleasure to use to load.  I have a large noborigama and lifting heavier shelves into the backs and tops of the multiple chambers takes its toll these days.  (Right before putting in the 500 hardbricks that it takes to close all the doors!)  The Advancers change that back breaking work a LOT.

 

When we fire periodic kilns a huge amount of the energy used goes to heating the kiln, posts and shelves, not the pieces in the kiln.  (This is why industry uses continuous kilns.)  The weight difference of the Advancers over other shelves will decrease the firing cost in every firing.  You are heating less shelf.  The more you fire... the more you'll save in energy costs.

 

Also they are incredibly thin compared to all other shelves.  So in every firing you get a bit more ware into the kiln where before there were shelves taking up that space.  One layer of plates....... in every firing....... and that starts to help pay some of the "sticker shock" too.

 

Then there is the cleanup advantage.  "Time is money".  They are a SNAP to clean of any crap that gets on them.  Even in wood fire... I can clean most of the issues with a putty knife.

 

Now, as to the "wetness" issue.  Yes... if they get WET they take a long time to dry and if they are not dried ... they will sort of "explode". 

 

But "wet" is a relative term.  If you are in a studio that is not located in a swamp....... you likely will be just fine.  A lot of the "bad rap" that Advancers got early on was from wood firers......who were shifting to them because of the easy cleanup factor.  Most wood kilns are in (barely) covered shed outbuildings, with no heat.  Often with dirt floors.  And the kilns are fired somewhat infrequently.  So there is lots of moisture present and time for it to penetrate into the shelves.  In an "electric kiln type studio"...... unless you store them directly on a REALLY damp concrete floor (put some risers under them) ... I can't see a significant issue. 

 

Even if you have to buy them one at a time over time... do yourself the favor. 

 

best,

 

..........................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another plug here for Advancers.  Yes, they do come with built in "sticker shock".  But there are a LOT of advantages.  There IS payback there.  As they say "you get what you pay for".

 

I too am "maturing".  Or maybe we'll call it "ripening".  Aw crap.... I'm getting old too.  And I find Advancers a real pleasure to use to load.  I have a large noborigama and lifting heavier shelves into the backs and tops of the multiple chambers takes its toll these days.  (Right before putting in the 500 hardbricks that it takes to close all the doors!)  The Advancers change that back breaking work a LOT.

 

When we fire periodic kilns a huge amount of the energy used goes to heating the kiln, posts and shelves, not the pieces in the kiln.  (This is why industry uses continuous kilns.)  The weight difference of the Advancers over other shelves will decrease the firing cost in every firing.  You are heating less shelf.  The more you fire... the more you'll save in energy costs.

 

Also they are incredibly thin compared to all other shelves.  So in every firing you get a bit more ware into the kiln where before there were shelves taking up that space.  One layer of plates....... in every firing....... and that starts to help pay some of the "sticker shock" too.

 

Then there is the cleanup advantage.  "Time is money".  They are a SNAP to clean of any crap that gets on them.  Even in wood fire... I can clean most of the issues with a putty knife.

 

Now, as to the "wetness" issue.  Yes... if they get WET they take a long time to dry and if they are not dried ... they will sort of "explode". 

 

But "wet" is a relative term.  If you are in a studio that is not located in a swamp....... you likely will be just fine.  A lot of the "bad rap" that Advancers got early on was from wood firers......who were shifting to them because of the easy cleanup factor.  Most wood kilns are in (barely) covered shed outbuildings, with no heat.  Often with dirt floors.  And the kilns are fired somewhat infrequently.  So there is lots of moisture present and time for it to penetrate into the shelves.  In an "electric kiln type studio"...... unless you store them directly on a REALLY damp concrete floor (put some risers under them) ... I can't see a significant issue. 

 

Even if you have to buy them one at a time over time... do yourself the favor. 

 

best,

 

..........................john

John, I think your making a persuasive argument and winning me over to the side of "goodness and light" .  Now I just need to talk to my banker (wife).  :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bioman, in case your banker does not approve your advancer budget, I am another fan of CoreLight shelves. I use both solid cordierite and CoreLight shelves, and the difference in weight is dramatic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bioman, in case your banker does not approve your advancer budget, I am another fan of CoreLight shelves. I use both solid cordierite and CoreLight shelves, and the difference in weight is dramatic.

Well, after a discussion with my Banker who laughed at the Advancer cost I think it will be the Corelight shelves for now.  Guess I keep using kiln wash a while longer :angry:  But at lease my back will be happier. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.