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Diana@NatureGirlStudio.com

How To Repair Glaze Flaws?

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I just pulled out of the kiln a large cone 6 bowl with a fern imprint. The imprint was first handpainted with stains, then entire bowl was glazed with clear. In three deeper recesses of the fern stem, the clear glaze either pulled away or didn't adhere, leaving three dry areas where food could catch.

 

 

What is the best way to repair these flaws (and still allow the bowl to be safe for food)? Reglaze & refire (slowly, of course, as it could fracture in a refire)? Other creative ideas? Thanks for any suggestions.

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I don't know how big you are talking about. I have pressed dried glaze into problem areas and refired. Sometime I have to dampen the glaze just a tad. I just use a nail to scape some glaze off the upper part of the glaze bucket and use it.

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I have touched up pieces like this, with a quick thin additional layer of clear, (as long as you have no big glaze drips on the outside wall near the bottom that might continue to migrate down), and then refire. As Marcia said, lots depends on the size of the pieces. Smaller ones, no problem. Stoneware, no problem. Once you get into the porcelain range and larger (like over 8" or so) Fergetaboutit.

So....question is size? Firing temp? Claybody?

Best of luck...happens to all of us. Of course if you have a "big name:" in the pottery world you can just say "there will never be another one like it," and sell it at a higher price than originally planned! I watched that happen with a nationally recognized potter to rmain namesless, with a large wall plate and he sold it, with a hunka kiln wash and piece of shelf stuck to it! Of course this was not a functional piece. Another ball game!

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I don't know how big you are talking about. I have pressed dried glaze into problem areas and refired. Sometime I have to dampen the glaze just a tad. I just use a nail to scape some glaze off the upper part of the glaze bucket and use it.

 

 

I do the repair more often on porcelain. I also smooth out sharp edges on craters with a diamond pad and reglaze and fire.

Marcia

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Thanks for all of the great suggestions!

 

The area that crawled was reasonably small -- about 2mm x 6mm. I scraped the area with a dental tool, added clear glaze and refired the piece. It looks just fine.

 

Great idea about using a diamond pad to smooth the edges. Those are spendy little guys, but they're so useful!

 

Thanks again!

 

Diana

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Thanks for all of the great suggestions!

 

The area that crawled was reasonably small -- about 2mm x 6mm. I scraped the area with a dental tool, added clear glaze and refired the piece. It looks just fine.

 

Great idea about using a diamond pad to smooth the edges. Those are spendy little guys, but they're so useful!

 

Thanks again!

 

Diana

 

They really last and can be used in many steps of the process. I learned that from David Roberts when we were both teaching workshops in Kelowna.

I was lucky to get one of his pieces.

 

 

Marcia

 

 

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