Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
immortalambitions

Glaze Testing, Charts & Note Taking ?'s

Recommended Posts

I am taking advanced ceramics courses at a University and need help organizing my thoughts/ideas/notes regarding glazes and glaze testing.

 

I have searched the internet (research is NOT my strongest point) for some sort of chart/form that can help me keep detailed/thorough and consistent notes about my glaze testing.

 

I have seen a program that will do this, but it is currently outside of my price-range

Does anyone have or know where I could get something similar as a starting point.

My memory stinks and have TOO MANY thoughts floating around in my head NOT TO do a detailed note-taking process.

Also, I am attending college to become a teacher and would like to have something that helps my future students to keep track of recipes & results of glaze testing.

 

Also, if there currently are not any, does anyone have ideas on the most important things to note in this chart.
​if I develop one, I will share it.

thanks
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as you lable your glaze tests with a unique number I have found no problems with pen and paper. I can probably pick up 90% of the tiles round my studio and match them to notes.

 

Having another digital copy is always good but pen and paper is much easier to use in the studio with all the dust and mess about. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi immortalambitions and welcome.

 

Notes I want to keep long term I put onto the computer in the Insight glaze calc program that I use. For quick simple notes when glazing I use this: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/potterynotes-listgizmo/id537451083?mt=8  I have it on my ipad, I mostly use it for taking before and after pictures of glaze tests, keepers ones go into Insight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My other recommendation on the subject of pottery testing.

 

1. Make the tests in the way you make your pieces. So if you spray all your glazes, spray the test tiles too. If you never double-dip, don't include it on your test tiles.

 

2. Work in a loose fashion if that is how you wish to work. I make various strengths of slips with accuracy of a spoon. I also dip the same working brush across containers. But if precision and making repeatable pieces is desired, measuring a recipe is important.

This is more useful with colorant testing. Taking a base glaze and seeing the reply to a little cobalt, copper, chrome, iron, lots of iron etc etc doesn't have to be done with exact amounts. And then say you like the way the copper test looked-- then measure out 1%, 2%, 3% ... to refine the search with accuracy.

 

3. The amount of water added is a harder part of making good tests.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best advice I have for learning to glaze (note I did NOT say learning to make glaze): keep a note book with glazes used, and write in it exactly what you did at each glaze session (at least while developing new work). If you make a plan beforehand, but alter it on the fly, you will never remember what you did. Write it down!!! Application details, original recipes plus any alterations, and combos used and in what order. Make further notes after everything comes out of the kiln. If you don't, you will say really bad words at yourself in 5 years when you're trying to revisit something you were *pretty sure* you'd remember.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my friend gave me a copy of the sheets she used to keep track of her glazing history.  i never used it but it might give you an idea or two so i am sending it.  the box is for a photo of the finished piece.  if i used this system, i would put all the info on one page for each glaze, not 5 glazes on one sheet of paper.  that way i could modify the info to include changes to the recipe, etc.  

 

 

well, the photo will not post.    i have smallerized it several times but it will not post.                                       

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make a spread sheet with the glaze & lines to write or type in the formula, then I use the next column for ingredients, next i add on the Weight of the bowl I measure into, next column I use to check each ingredient as it is measured.

When I have tested & been satisfied I use the following columns for larger amounts, etc. I print these sheets & keep them where I mix glazes along with dates & result info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to the Dollar Store and bought a dozen spiral bound index card (pads. 100 cards per note pad. These are spiral bound <index> cards, not blank paper. I only use oxides as colorants: so each pad is marked Fe, iron, Co, cobalt, Cu-copper... etc etc. So each pad contains the notes on one colorant. I use a china marker to write a number on the back of each test tile such as Fe101. That in turn corresponds with the numerical entry in the various journals. You can make up your own test protocols such as: temmoku, shino, etc etc. Use one pad per glaze and or colorant. Easy way to keep things sorted out while testing. I also use the china marker to denote on the back of the tile peak temp, hold ramps, or cooling ramps.

I keep an extensive firing journal on my computer and use the test tile ref. #'s as points of reference. "1% copper produced this color or effect- see tile Cu104"... then any additional information or glaze modifications. In simple terms: a numerical rolledex.

Nerd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in no way associated with the app 'Pottery Notebook" but it is an inexpensive(1.50$) option available through google play store.

​

If you aren't already using calculation software do it sooner than later. Glaze testing with pencil and paper was fun and 'all' but I sure do enjoy pulling out my phone(InsightLive) to see what adding/subtracting/substituting this or that will do to my percentage of what-not.

 

 

​

​cheers!

 

*most new projects/ideas are still 'mapped' out in pencil though. In this regard i can appreciate where a spreadsheet might come in handy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For glaze making I use a combination of paper and photography. All my testing recipes are on paper in my book. I then photograph the fired tiles and also photograph the page in the book so I can easily look at them side by side. Also, you can't break the tiles once they are digital. That's why I started doing it this way, I dropped a couple hundred tiles on the floor and spent a pointless week gluing them together again....

I haven't started doing it yet, but it's also a good idea to photograph the kiln log for the relevant firing as that can have a big effect on the glaze.

here's an example of what I'm doing currently

https://www.flickr.com/photos/expatat/albums/72157653239150013/page8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.