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Is There A Name For This Glaze Technique

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I've been noticing this glazing technique in some pottery on Pinterest ,( both modern and antique pieces ) and wondered what it was called. It seems that the lines must be done with a resist, so I tried some wax in a squeeze bottle but could not get a consistent line width. Anybody know about this technique? 

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post-17681-0-22371600-1454126931_thumb.png

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There is a black wax resist out there that is quite useful. If the circles are incised with various sized hole cutting saw blades or some other tool, keeping wax in the line would be pretty easy, from there underglaze techniques with a transparent over top should match up.

 

best,

Pres

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If I were to attempt to do something like this, I think I'd coat the  leatherhard piece in resist, then cut the circle lines through the wax and brush black slip onto the exposed clay.  I'd bisque it and then use underglaze to color the circles, finishing with a sprayed on light clear glaze.

 

Though looking at the piece again, the colors might come from glaze, rather than underglaze.

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If I were to attempt to do something like this, I think I'd coat the  leatherhard piece in resist, then cut the circle lines through the wax and brush black slip onto the exposed clay.  I'd bisque it and then use underglaze to color the circles, finishing with a sprayed on light clear glaze.

 

Though looking at the piece again, the colors might come from glaze, rather than underglaze.

 

 

Ditto on the approach.

 

I also agree they could be glaze.  Most low fire glazes would stay put well enough to do that.  But to play it safe, I would just use underglaze with a clear top coat.

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All these techniques would work, I've used all of them and they would totally get the look you want.

You could also draw a design with a slip trailer for a raised barrier between glazes. I've done that before and it turns out really nice. 

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People here make lovely tiles with this technique.

Looks like cuerda seca - lines are brushed on using a mixture of wax and Mason stain with a fine paintbrush The line resists the glaze so it stays in its place.. We usually apply the glaze with small squeeze bottles, with fine needle tops and then high fire. It's kind of like painting by numbers...

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Hmm. While that might indeed be the technique, not one line, one circle, one edge is out of place. No overlapping glaze anywhere. The form is also supernaturally round as well.

 

This makes me think that it wasn't "free-hand" painted at all. Sure maybe the colors were filled in, maybe..., but it couldn't be a hand glazed work entirely because I don't see any evidence of hand-work; glaze moves too much and hands are too unsteady.

 

I think if I wanted to work at recreating this, I'd have to mold the thing, with circular indentations as a part of the model, perhaps working off of something that was very circular like a plastic ball. Then take little ring cutters to the cast (for the perfection of the circle, again). Recast that. Practice a million times on drawing black resist in the cast circular channels, then apply the color inside of circular barriers so that my stroke-n-coat trailer didn't wander outside of the black lines. Spend a decade cleaning channels if need be.

 

The Islamic tile at the Met is quite variable in pattern and application. It's brilliantly done, but not "perfect".

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It's not that I want to reproduce that particular example or motif. drmyrtle.......(I actually want to make some stylized flowers. ) and not that I want machine perfect lines.......maybe I just need to practice :) I looked up back wax resist and it's pretty darn expensive, so maybe I will try the mason stain idea with the wax ai have on hand. Thanks to all who have replied and given me new ideas.

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angelica pozo, a tile maker in ohio, has 2 books out showing various ways to work.  she gives a recipe for the black lines and here it is.  i have not tried it myself but wrote it when she gave it to me.

 

wax glazeline

stain               70

frit 3110          30

 

add liquid wax to proper consistency for trailing.

 

i had no frit 3110 at the time so i did not try it.

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One of my favorite beadmakers Golem Studios has a nice tutorial on how they achieve this effect by carving at greenware stage and then filling in each glaze individually after bisque. Here's the carving tutorial: http://www.blog.beadsofclay.org/2011/03/birth-of-ladybug.html

and the glazing tutorials: http://ceramicbeadartists.com/tutorials.php?pg=dx17

 

These techniques could be used on a larger scale to achieve the look of the vase, some of their beads appear to have black glaze put down in the lines first, wiped back and then the lighter color glazes added.

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Yes,it is cuerda seca as mentioned above. It is a Spanish technique using a greasy line mixed with manganese for the black color. It means "dry line".

It is similar to Cloisonné in that the cells of color are separated by a barrier.

 

Marcia

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