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Oxidation Or Reduction


Babs

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Just wondering, can you tell by just reading whether a glaze will be more suited/attractive by firing in reduction or oxidation?

I liked a glaze I saw called variegated slate blue, but it was only coming across the same glaze again that I noticed it was labelled for reduction.

the colourants were rutile and copper carb from memory so if fired in oxidation...it would be more what?? green? less variegated?

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Mastering Cone 6 glazes has a glaze named Variegated Slate Blue.  It works in both oxidation and reduction.  MC6G glazes were developed for electric oxidation; some have been found to work in reduction also.

 

http://www.masteringglazes.com/mastering-cone-6-glazes/glazes/variegated-slate-blue-figur.html

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The Variegated Slate Blue in Mastering Cone 6 Glazes has rutile, cobalt, and copper in it. I have fired it in both oxidation and reduction, and it is beautiful either way. As for being able to predict how a glaze will come out in oxidation or reduction just by looking at the recipe, you can only do that for some well known types of glaze, such as copper reds. Those will be red only in reduction, and will be turquoise-y aqua in oxidation. Other types of glazes, such as shinos and tenmokus generally only work in reduction and are blah in oxidation. Yet others, such as glazes with zinc oxide as a flux will fail in reduction. Frequently, you can only learn by testing it.

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I use Variegated Slate Blue in my small gas kiln.  I have had to adjust it slightly for shivering...the fit with the clay I use?  The kiln does not give me uniform reduction but the glaze works well whatever the atmosphere.  I have never had any hint of red from this glaze.

Lin

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