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Crunchypop

Cooking Pizza In A Pottery Kiln, Toxicity ?

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I was told Stoke on Trent was going downhill very fast as to ceramic manufacturing from one who used to live and work there.Any labs left or have they all moved offshore?

Well sounds like there is an opening for food testing coming their way!!

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I always fire my pizza in gas reduction. Would you mind sharing your oxidation pizza recipe with us?

 

Serious though I wouldn't worry about any hazards from a pizza baked in a kiln once in awhile. I also run with scissors. 

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This whole thread got me thinking about using dough instead of clay. Its cheaper and is easier to roll out.

 

I could bake it in my oven and paint it.

I have had many customers ask if I bake and paint and now I can say yes I do.

 

thanks crustypops for the great idea

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I always fire my pizza in gas reduction. Would you mind sharing your oxidation pizza recipe with us?

 

Serious though I wouldn't worry about any hazards from a pizza baked in a kiln once in awhile. I also run with scissors. 

DO you take photos and paste them on public media?

I used to run with my dogs till the obvious happened, the obvious being  dog stops suddenly runner did not , ankle injury, skin missing, dog missing, off after kangaroo....morning serenity lost to profanities...  lesson not learned,  dog neatly, sneakily clips the heels of runner, full length splat, lesson learned, running way too dangerous an occupation to engage in with dogs.

Do what's comfortable for yourself in your own time/studio but don't paste it in pubic if you do not know the consequences

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Guest JBaymore

 

This thread is just not going to die

 

You should see the size of the Facebook thread.

 

best,

 

................john

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In regards to toxicity I can't help but see articles about London breaching annual pollution limits in a week or by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish and think even with some dubious practices you are very unlikely to poison yourself anywhere near the daily intake you get already.

 

We poison ourselves from the ground up.

 

What's a few toxic metals between friends, who knows, maybe once the antibiotics stop working toxic metals will be ingested for killing bacteria.

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I was told Stoke on Trent was going downhill very fast as to ceramic manufacturing from one who used to live and work there.Any labs left or have they all moved offshore?

Just spent the morning phoning around and yes there are a number of companies still testing tableware etc in Stoke. A foible of exporting to the USA from the UK is that all tableware  must be tested for food safety. Or have a sticker on the base stating "Not for food use". As far as I understand domestically produced tableware in the USA doesn't have to have the same stringent testing.  I also found a laboratory in Stoke that will test food for heavy metal contamination. The costs are $30 per type of metal, so testing for Lead, copper, platinum etc could rapidly escalate. So I've decided to keep my Kiln clean, use my dedicated "Pizza kiln shelf" and risk it. I tend to agree with some of the forum members, I'm more likely to die of consuming too much pizza, than heavy metal poisoning.

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Guest JBaymore

In regards to toxicity I can't help but see articles about London breaching annual pollution limits in a week or by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish and think even with some dubious practices you are very unlikely to poison yourself anywhere near the daily intake you get already.

 

We poison ourselves from the ground up.

 

What's a few toxic metals between friends, who knows, maybe once the antibiotics stop working toxic metals will be ingested for killing bacteria.

 

Those who care...... maybe look up the toxicological use of the terms "Total Body Burden" and "Synergy" and "Chronic".

 

It is not that the occasional slice of pizza cooked in the kiln is going to suddenly kill you.  Or make you obviously "sick" at the time.  That is absurd (unless you use spoiled food ingredients  ;) .) 

 

It is that the practice reflects a poor approach in general to health and safety concerns and that it opens up another totally unnecessary route of entry to tiny micro-doses of occupational toxins to the body. When sharing this with "the community" without acknowledging that fact, it passes on a casual attitude about the reality of any concerns for appropriate health and safety in the studio practices.

 

It is not about 'sealing ourselves in giant baggies" and avoiding the world.  It is about making informed decisions about which risks we think are reasonable ones to take.  It we are not informed about those possible risks... then we are not making informed decisions.  We are just making decisions.  The CAD forums (and others), and the classroom, and when people visit your studio are all "educational moments".  Pointing out that there are potential risks is simply being a 'good citizen' within the community.

 

If you KNOW that such practices are potentially hazardous (in the LONG term....not acute), and want to still do that.... fine.  Informed consent.  But a lot of folks would not even think that there might be any risk ... unless they get told about it in some way.

 

We will all get out of here dead.  How long it is before that happens and how we make the grand exit might be somewhat in our control.  Some might not care.....some might.   

 

best,

 

........................john

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Guest JBaymore

 

As far as I understand domestically produced tableware in the USA doesn't have to have the same stringent testing.

 

Same FDA and State of California standards apply.

 

best,

 

....................john

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I actually think everything would be fine, especially if you wash it down with some Flint, Michigan tap water.

If you use Flint water in your glazes, they come out brighter and more beautiful. See, there is always a silver lining even to rain clouds... No wait, that would be another toxic heavy metal contaminant. It makes me want to shield myself from all this stuff....No wait. That would be made out of more lead. I'm so confused, I'm going to take a bath...No wait.Ugh!

 

Jed

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I think it depends on what has been in the kiln - if during the life of the kiln it has just been normal clay, and glazes of non-toxic materials, then it is probably OK except that the dust may make the pizza a bit crunchier than expected.

If it has had any toxic materials - and I would include any commercial glazes where you don't know exactly what is in it - then it isn't worth the risk. Although the kiln temperature itself is very low (by pottery standards), the elements will still be getting hot, as will those parts of the kiln close to the elements, so any toxic materials deposited round there from previous firings may vaporise and then deposit on the pizza, in addition to any toxic dust.

Sounds like a prime case for a sagger to me, or perhaps put it on top of the kiln if you are high firing and it gets hot enough.

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On the testing side, even though the same standards apply for domestic and imported ware in the US, I can well believe that stuff made in the US can self-certify, but if imported into the US the manufacturer must pay to put it through a test house. I know this is a case for FCC type approval of electronics, for example.

Good to see how protectionism carries on despite all the hype about free trade - or do we just believe that foreigners are less trustworthy or less competent than us?

Another observation from my marine electronics background - the "Not food safe" label reminds me of digital nautical charts - the software/app/electronic chart plotter always shows a message saying "Not to be used for navigation" at start up, which everyone ignores. Labels like this seem to me primarily to fend off lawyers and health and safety / trading standards officers, as if it is shaped like a mug, people will use it like a mug, and not risk spilling their coffee looking for a label on the base.

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 - the "Not food safe" label reminds me of digital nautical charts - the software/app/electronic chart plotter always shows a message saying "Not to be used for navigation" at start up, which everyone ignores.

 

Stunt/BMX bikes with labels that say "not for jumping".............  Paper cups from coffee shops - "this product may be hot"...............Bag of nuts and raisins "warning made in factory that produces nut products".............

 

I wouldn't cook in my kiln, nor would I try to fire pots in my oven.

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