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WhiskedWhisky

Showy Clear Glaze

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Newbie here.   :huh:   I've been experimenting using different colored clay bodies and even colored clays using oxides and stains.  Mostly for neriage/agateware technique.  So far i've been leaving the exterior unglazed to show the true colors of the clay (usually buff, with ochre, white, or bclay).  I've tried to glaze my pieces using an cone 6 oxidation clear glaze and cone 10 reduction clear glaze, but i find that the clay colors gets "covered" up by the glaze.  Expecially in cone 10 where most of my dark clays (with iron) turns grey.  

 

Can anyone suggest an alternative glaze or material that will show through the clay underneath?  tips?

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Clear glazes can affect color results, but you can get minimal changes by using the right glazes.

If you are not a high production potter, you will find the commercial zinc free clear glazes do not change your colors. I have only used Amaco brands but I would think others would work too.

If you are making non functional wares, or for the outside of functional ware you can brush on a soda ash mix. One part soda ash to four parts hot water ... This produces a lovely eggshell gloss. Multiple applications increase the fluxing and the shine. DO NOT put the leftover liquid down the drain!

The June/July/August 2014 issue of Ceramics Monthly has a fabulous transparent matte glaze recipe by Kyla Toomey that does not affect color.

Anything with Gerstley Borate in it will affect many colors ... especially greens which turn brown.

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Chris, I applaud your reluctance to publish recipes not already in the public domain.

However, can I ask if this is the same glaze.


Hi Barry,For some time I have been using a glaze recipe given to me by Kyla Toomey that is a clear which has a satin feel. She did not know its provenance, only that a friend of hers found it on the internet. My friend Ellen Mulligan (whose knowledge of all things pottery is truly encyclopedic) figured out that this is Tony Hansen's glaze from the Digitalfire site - a huge thank you to him for that website!G1214Z 36.  Ferro frit 312427.   Wollastonite35.   EPK5.      Silica( yup - it adds up to 103, but these nice round numbers require it)For a more matte surface, one might slow the cooling down some.Enjoy!Jen JenSteinStudio.com

 

http://glazy.org/recipes/1486

http://lists.clayartworld.com/pipermail/clayart/2014-September/003380.html

http://digitalfire.com/4sight/recipes/cone_6_silky_matte_3.html

 

 

 

 

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First post for me although I've been a long time lurker. I have limited experience mixing glazes using school supplies but have never purchased my own.

 

I'm wanting to try the Toomey transparent matte recipe from the Ceramics Monthly article. The recipe calls for silica but doesn't state what mesh size. I can get a 200 or 400. Can someone tease out why I should choose one over the other? 

 

Thanks in advance!

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Thanks Chris!  is there a spceific Amaco brand clear glaze you would recommend?  the clear celadon mixer maybe?  

 

i'll also give the soda ash mixture a try.  it will be my first at mixing something!  specifically how hot should the water be?  and can the leftovers be kept contained?  So the soda ash recipe is totally non-foodsafe?  exterior of bowls and containers maybe?  and can it be fired at cone 6 or 10?

 

(yup.  definitely newbie at glaze making here)

 

much appreciated :)

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First post for me although I've been a long time lurker. I have limited experience mixing glazes using school supplies but have never purchased my own.

 

I'm wanting to try the Toomey transparent matte recipe from the Ceramics Monthly article. The recipe calls for silica but doesn't state what mesh size. I can get a 200 or 400. Can someone tease out why I should choose one over the other? 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Generally, for glazes 325 mesh or 400 mesh.  It will melt smoother and is a better glass former.   Potters who make clay bodies often use 200 mesh.  They do not want the clay body becoming too glass-like and the larger mesh melts well but not glass-well.  When mixing, use good safety practices -- especially with silica. 

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i'll also give the soda ash mixture a try.  it will be my first at mixing something!  specifically how hot should the water be?  and can the leftovers be kept contained?  So the soda ash recipe is totally non-foodsafe?  exterior of bowls and containers maybe?  and can it be fired at cone 6 or 10?

 

I use the soda ash wash at both cone 6 and 10.  The water needs to be hot enough to dissolve the soda ash -- not boiling, but hot.  I generally only make 1 cup at a time, apply with a sponge, and have little left over.  I dispose of it in a clay pit in the yard (not through a drain or near storm drain).  I do not use the soda ash wash on food surfaces; exteriors only. 

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