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Matej

Help With Specific Glaze ...

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Hi, my name is Matej and I need some little help of more skilled potters than me :) ...

 

I want to make a glazed surface on my pots with "irregular and random unexpected" spots ... I try to do something, but I was more and less unsuccessful ... (I attached example from web - it is easy to show what I am talking about ...)

 

Does anyone have any idea where I can get knowledge about this topic ... 

 

I will be very grateful for any help ...

 

Matej

post-73800-0-89525400-1451989017_thumb.jpg

post-73800-0-89525400-1451989017_thumb.jpg

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@Matej, This looks a lot like a Cone 10 glaze that we fire in reduction called "Bird Matte".  The mottled look that you see on the outside is pretty typical of the results.  On interior and thicker applications, it breaks with a nice pale blue.

 

It would be helpful to know a little more information on your question:

  • What clay body are you using?
  • Are you firing oxidation or reduction?
  • What temperature (cone) are you looking for?

Good luck (and welcome to the forum!),

-Paul

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I would spot as random or controlled as you want wax resist of some kind. Looks like it is a dark clay body that the glaze has crawled in this wierd spot pattern. 

 

Not sure on the recipe they are using to do this, doesn't look like the are painting anything on and the glaze itself is doing this.

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it appears to me as if it is a reduced cone 10 glaze.  if you fire clay and glaze in a kiln that has something actually burning, wood, gas, oil, etc. the metals in the clay can come to the surface and appear just like the "spots" you see in the photo.  this kind of firing is not done in an electric kiln and no glaze you make or buy will give you the same results in an electric kiln.  the kind of firing is very special and takes a long while to learn since not only do you need to control the temperature but you need to control the amount of oxygen reaching the fire. 

 

where did you get the picture?  is there a potter's name with the photo? 

 

mark, do you agree?

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matej, if you look carefully at the two larger "spots" near the top, you can see that the darkness in the center appears to have exploded from under the coating of glaze.  that is why the surrounding light circle of glaze look thicker around the explosion than on the rest of the surface.  it is the classic look of a reduced firing.

 

this is called "reduced" because at some time during the firing, the oxygen is prevented from reaching the flames.  the fire needs oxygen so it forces the oxygen out of the clay body resulting in the tiny explosion you see.

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Hi everyone! Thank you for the welcome. And thank you for quick reply. Yes of course I did not mentioned ... I am usually using dark clay ... electric kiln (oxidation) cone 10 ...

 

Hmmm, do you think that there is any connection with special glazing "additives"  ... for example, tin oxide ... that's the only way to quickly hear about it.
 
I will find the source of this image ...
 
:)

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Electric kilns are very good at regular and consistent results. There are some some ways of achieving irregular and inconsistent in the glaze application process.

 

I will always recommend a dip, pour, or spray to make sure the entire surface has an even coat of glaze on it. But before you do that you can soak a sponge in any nice high-iron glaze and damp just a little on. This is also possible (a little more difficult) after the even coat is applied. Naturally you have to experiment with how much or how little glaze to deposit with the sponge.

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Norikazu Oe seems to be the name of the potter. Can't find his own website to get much info.

 

Norikazu Oe

Norikazu Oe began his relationship with ceramics early, training in Seto, one of Japan's foremost pottery centers. After graduating, he continued his training in Tajimi, another of Japan's famous pottery towns before going independent in 1999 . He currently works out of his studio in the hills of Gifu Prefecture producing his distinctive ceramics.

 

https://www.analoguelife.com/en/artists/norikazu-oe

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